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A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every... Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, August 2, 2012 12:00:00 AM
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A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
MTC
Posted: Thursday, August 2, 2012 4:03:18 AM
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"Thestorides, full many things there are that mortals
cannot sound; but there is nothing more unfathomable than the
heart of man."

Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns and Homerica
THE EPIGRAMS OF HOMER

Epigram V
pedro
Posted: Thursday, August 2, 2012 5:28:22 AM

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A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.


http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/10/19/article-1321779-0BAC45ED000005DC-419_638x401.jpg

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
jcbarros
Posted: Thursday, August 2, 2012 12:43:39 PM

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6.ooo.ooo.ooo mysterious unfathomable creatures around here.
RubyMoon
Posted: Thursday, August 2, 2012 1:29:26 PM
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A Tale of Two Cities - Charles Dickens


Chapter 3
The Night Shadows


A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every one of those darkly clustered houses encloses its own secret; that every room in every one of them encloses its own secret; that every beating heart in the hundreds of thousands of breasts there, is, in some of its imaginings, a secret to the heart nearest it! Something of the awfulness, even of Death itself, is referable to this. No more can I turn the leaves of this dear book that I loved, and vainly hope in time to read it all. No more can I look into the depths of this unfathomable water, wherein, as momentary lights glanced into it, I have had glimpses of buried treasure and other things submerged. It was appointed that the book should shut with a spring, for ever and for ever, when I had read but a page. It was appointed that the water should be locked in an eternal frost, when the light was play- ing on its surface, and I stood in ignorance on the shore. My friend is dead, my neighbour is dead, my love, the darling of my soul, is dead; it is the inexorable consolidation and perpetuation of the secret that was always in that individuality, and which I shall carry in mine to my life’s end. In any of the burial-places of this city through which I pass, is there a sleeper more inscrutable than its busy inhabitants are, in their innermost personality, to me, or than I am to them?

Source:
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/98/old/2city12p.pdf
Lucie
Posted: Thursday, August 2, 2012 3:55:33 PM
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This is one of my favorite book quotes of all time. Definitely my favorite from Tale of Two Cities. It always irritated me that the "best of times/worst of time" quote got all of the attention.
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