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Demeanor vs Attitude vs Behavior Options
oozypal
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 1:47:37 AM
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Joined: 3/18/2012
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Hello,

Can you guys/gals help me in the difference between Demeanor, Attitude, Behavior?

Thank you
OOzy
rogermue
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 2:29:11 AM

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Location: München, Bavaria, Germany
If you want to express the idea how someone acts or conducts oneself, especially towards others
the normal word is 'behaviour'.

'demeanour' can mean the same as 'behaviour', but it is a rare word, I should say it is literary style. And I think the focus can also be more on oneself: The way how one acts and behaves so that others have a certain image of oneself.

'attitude' towards sth or someone is not exactly the same as 'behaviour', e.g.
you can have an optimistic or a pessimistic attitude towards life.

Actually as a non-native speaker I'm not the right person for such a question. But I like problems of delimitation of words and always try if I can do it - I can't resist.
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 10:58:25 AM

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oozypal wrote:
Hello,

Can you guys/gals help me in the difference between Demeanor, Attitude, Behavior?

Thank you
OOzy



I see only shades of difference between demeanor and attitude. To me, demeanor is not only the facial expressions, but also the body movements of an individual that convey their outlook and mental state of mind.

This is also attitude, but attitude carries with it slightly more in that attitude is expressed in the habitual responses to the environment and/or to the people within it. I also see attitude as being expressed more physically that demeanor. This may just be me, but a dominating or arrogant attitude usually can be seen in how one carries oneself physically.

Behavior is the action carried out; expressing the demeanor or attitude of the individual. A person may habitually be calm, even in the face of irritation. His demeanor and attitude, therefore, would be described as such.

However, if that same person consistently expressed rage whenever irritated, his demeanor and attitude would be described as very unpleasant.




A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
almostfreebird
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 11:24:25 AM

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Joined: 4/22/2011
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Location: Japan
When I was rooting for Boston Red Sox some years ago, I often heard someone say/write "Manny(Manny Ramirez), he's got an attitude".

That means badass or something like that, I think, but "badass" doesn't sound negative, I'm not sure.







leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 2:54:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Miami, Florida, United States
oozypal wrote:
Hello,

Can you guys/gals help me in the difference between Demeanor, Attitude, Behavior?

Thank you
OOzy


Here are some other shades of meaning from a different part of the English-speaking world.

The word "behavior" usually refers to specific observable actions. Among the three words, it is the most neutral, and doesn't suggest a value judgment beyond the fact that it occurred.

"Demeanor" suggests a general tendency — good or bad — that can be observed in a person's behavior. It involves considering the actions and forming an opinion about them.

"Attitude" refers to the emotional state or motives someone expresses towards other persons or things. Its literal meaning is "orientation" or "direction of motion".
So when it is said that someone needs an "attitude adjustment," that is a play on words using a "course correction" of an airliner or ship as a metaphor for punishment to discourage bad intentions.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 3:57:48 PM

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I don't think I can add to the answers already given except to say that, in Britain, as rogermue says, 'demeanour' is not a common word.

almostfreebird - your "He's got an attitude" phrase is slang. It does have the implication that it is a bad attitude, or at least one you disagree with.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 4:24:18 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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leonAzul wrote:
oozypal wrote:
Hello,

Can you guys/gals help me in the difference between Demeanor, Attitude, Behavior?

Thank you
OOzy


Here are some other shades of meaning from a different part of the English-speaking world.

The word "behavior" usually refers to specific observable actions. Among the three words, it is the most neutral, and doesn't suggest a value judgment beyond the fact that it occurred.

"Demeanor" suggests a general tendency — good or bad — that can be observed in a person's behavior. It involves considering the actions and forming an opinion about them.

"Attitude" refers to the emotional state or motives someone expresses towards other persons or things. Its literal meaning is "orientation" or "direction of motion".
So when it is said that someone needs an "attitude adjustment," that is a play on words using a "course correction" of an airliner or ship as a metaphor for punishment to discourage bad intentions.


I agree absolutely with these, can I just illustrate with some examples?

He is a good doctor, he has a calm demeanor that reassures patients.
He has a good attitude, he gets on well with people and is always happy to help.
He shows good behaviour, he obeys the rules and does not make trouble.
excaelis
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 10:53:25 PM

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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Your attitude may determine the demeanour you display while behaving. Cause, symptom, effect.

Sanity is not statistical
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, March 18, 2012 11:40:31 PM

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Joined: 9/19/2011
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@ excaelis

Excellent! Applause

A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, March 20, 2012 1:09:40 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Ex's succinct comment was excellent.

Perhaps, for L2 speakers the difference between the three words is difficult so they might more appreciate what Ex said if they keep in mind that

one's demeanour is one's outward bearing - the 'you' that the world sees.(Public) It might not necessarily have anything to do with how you really feel

One's attitude (disregarding the slang meaning) describes your inward self (Private): the feelings one has about something. It can remain hidden

One's behaviour refers to the actions one performs.(Public and Private) It doesn't necessarily tell us anything.
Lita-Mar Lenhart
Posted: Thursday, July 27, 2017 11:27:34 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/27/2017
Posts: 1
Neurons: 133
Location: Kelseyville, California, United States
Demeanor to me can be ascertained by body language, facial expressions and tone of voice.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 8:36:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,452
Neurons: 141,825
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello Lita-Mar.

Welcome to the forum!

Sadly, OOzypal never logged in to read any of our answers

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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