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Old Sayings for Rogermue- Add Some Options
Hope1
Posted: Monday, April 30, 2012 6:19:24 PM

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RuthP - I know. I agree re the 'could care less bit'. It was just grouped with the other two on the site.




Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts. Bernard M. Baruch 1870-1965
almostfreebird
Posted: Monday, April 30, 2012 6:42:05 PM

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You could say that "one could care..." though.


he could care if they crapped on a landmine,
but four or five of the protestors had gone back to the old days.

http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst24996_idioms-for--That-doesn-t-interest-me.aspx


RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, May 1, 2012 10:41:48 AM

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Hope1 wrote:
RuthP - I know. I agree re the 'could care less bit'. It was just grouped with the other two on the site.

We shall persevere! I've already indoctrinated my child and the pet-peeveBrick wall moves to the next generation.
Hope1
Posted: Tuesday, May 8, 2012 12:06:14 PM

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Joined: 8/31/2011
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I encountered the phrase 'dead to rights' this morning. I knew what it meant but Rogermue has me thinking about etymology these days. So I googled the phrase, as it seemed to be a strange construction at first glance.

This is one idea I found. I have not used this site before so I do not know how correct he is. But it does sound logical. (We have talked about the 'dead' part before, I think.)

Any other comments about derivation of this phrase?

http://www.word-detective.com/2008/04/11/dead-to-rights/

" “Dead to rights” is indeed an odd expression, dating at least to the mid-19th century, when it was first collected in a glossary of underworld slang (“Vocabulum, or The Rogue’s Lexicon,” by George Matsell, 1859). The first part of the phrase, “dead,” is a slang use of the word to mean “absolutely, without doubt.” This use is more commonly heard in the UK, where it dates back to the 16th century, than in the US. “Dead” meaning “certainly” is based on the earlier use of “dead” to mean, quite logically, “with stillness suggestive of death, absolutely motionless,” a sense we still use when we say someone is “dead asleep.” The “absolutely, without doubt” sense is also found in “dead broke” and “dead certain.”

The “to rights” part of the phrase is a bit more complicated. “To rights” has been used since the 14th century to mean “in a proper manner,” or, later, “in proper condition or order,” a sense we also use in phrases such as “to set to rights,” meaning “to make a situation correct and orderly” (“Employed all the afternoon in my chamber, setting things and papers to rights,” Samuel Pepys, 1662). In the phrase “caught dead to rights,” the connotation is that every formality required by the law has been satisfied, and that the apprehension is what crooks in the UK used to call a “fair cop,” a clean and justifiable arrest. (“Cop,” from the Latin “capere,” to seize, has long been used as slang for “to grab” as well as slang for a police officer.) Of course, there’s many a slip ‘twixt the cop and the lips of the jury', so we shall see. Wake me when it’s over.
(PS - this blog was in response years ago to a question about OJ Simpson being caught 'dead to rights' and the last sentence here was certainly precognitive.)

Heritage Dictionary says 'to rights' has the sense of 'at once'.

Somewhere else I saw 'bang to rights' as being a UK slang term.

Another site :
http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/57/messages/703.html

: "Dead to rights" is seen from the 19th century on, and is used mostly, I believe, as a synonym for red-handed or in the act, or at least with positive evidence of guilt, as in "I caught him dead to rights," According to the OED it can also be used to mean "completely, certainly."
: SS


Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts. Bernard M. Baruch 1870-1965
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