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Consequences are unpitying. Our deeds carry their terrible consequences, quite apart from any fluctuations that went... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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Consequences are unpitying. Our deeds carry their terrible consequences, quite apart from any fluctuations that went before—consequences that are hardly ever confined to ourselves.

George Eliot (1819-1880)
MTC
Posted: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 5:17:48 AM
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Joined: 1/18/2011
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It's from Adam Bede, Book 1st, Chapter XVI:

The smile that flitted across Arthur's face was a faint one, and instead of following Mr. Irwine's playful lead, he said, quite seriously—"Yes, that's the worst of it. It's a desperately vexatious thing, that after all one's reflections and quiet determinations, we should be ruled by moods that one can't calculate on beforehand. I don't think a man ought to be blamed so much if he is betrayed into doing things in that way, in spite of his resolutions."

"Ah, but the moods lie in his nature, my boy, just as much as his reflections did, and more. A man can never do anything at variance with his own nature. He carries within him the germ of his most exceptional action; and if we wise people make eminent fools of ourselves on any particular occasion, we must endure the legitimate conclusion that we carry a few grains of folly to our ounce of wisdom."

"Well, but one may be betrayed into doing things by a combination of circumstances, which one might never have done otherwise."

"Why, yes, a man can't very well steal a bank-note unless the bank-note lies within convenient reach; but he won't make us think him an honest man because he begins to howl at the bank-note for falling in his way."

"But surely you don't think a man who struggles against a temptation into which he falls at last as bad as the man who never struggles at all?"

"No, certainly; I pity him in proportion to his struggles, for they foreshadow the inward suffering which is the worst form of Nemesis. Consequences are unpitying. Our deeds carry their terrible consequences, quite apart from any fluctuations that went before—consequences that are hardly ever confined to ourselves. And it is best to fix our minds on that certainty, instead of considering what may be the elements of excuse for us. But I never knew you so inclined for moral discussion, Arthur? Is it some danger of your own that you are considering in this philosophical, general way?"

Give credit to Project Gutenberg. http://www.gutenberg.org/files/507/507-h/507-h.htm#2HCH0016
pedro
Posted: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 8:42:01 AM

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Joined: 5/21/2009
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You hear such free-will debates occasionally in pubs. They haven't changed much over the years.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
jcbarros
Posted: Wednesday, February 29, 2012 9:11:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/14/2010
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There are no rewards or punishments, only consequences. (W.R.Inge):-/
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