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A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal. Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)
paula veigel
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 6:18:26 AM
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What was he afraid of? Or is he being cynical. I would like to know what he is referring to.
jmacann
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 10:23:11 AM
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Nothing in particular. Call it cynical -if you will. He meant 'sincerity is powerful in every sense -and it may prove to be dangerous too'

---

This is because it is often used with another purpose in mind -i.e., it is "sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates even to dividing soul and spirit" - ... - It is sharper than the sharpest two-edged sword."
(Hebrews 4:12)

Just like the fangs and the tongue of a snake.
(From Job 20:16)

There are multitude of forms in which hatred or ill will manifests within us and all around us. A snake may embrace you -just to kill you -or else, consider also the following:

"Augustus was claimed to have been the son of Apollo, for his mother, while sleeping in the Temple of Apollo, had yielded to the embrace of a serpent which had left permanent marks upon her body. Ten months later, Augustus had been born."

Sometimes it is not easy at all to find the antidote to such a kind of snakebite.
Faith_sacrafic
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 11:30:45 AM
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He was knowingly being "cynical" (believing that people are motivated by self-interest; distrustful of human sincerity or integrity:) because his belief was that you couldn't be '"sincere" (the quality of being free from pretense, deceit, or hypocrisy) Even in his day common people were so far removed from the truth that if you told the truth it would cause panic death and maybe war. Much like today.
Jimbob
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 4:32:37 PM

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The three wise monkeys, see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. In western Culture (not Japanese culture) the three wise monkeys could be considered to be a little insincere by "looking the other way" so to speak.

note : sometimes a forth monkey (Japanese).
jcbarros
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 5:23:28 PM

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You´re the master of your silence and the slave of your words, so... shut up.
almostfreebird
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 6:47:43 PM

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Jimbob wrote:
The three wise monkeys, see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. In western Culture (not Japanese culture) the three wise monkeys could be considered to be a little insincere by "looking the other way" so to speak.

note : sometimes a forth monkey (Japanese).


Jimbo, speak fitly, or be silent. Wise-ass.

Jimbob
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 7:20:15 PM

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almostfreebird wrote:
[quote=Jimbob]The three wise monkeys, see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. In western Culture (not Japanese culture) the three wise monkeys could be considered to be a little insincere by "looking the other way" so to speak.

note : sometimes a forth monkey (Japanese).


Jimbo, speak fitly, or be silent. Wise-ass.

It's Jimbob not jimbo further more I don't take kindly to your brief insulting remark.
Desiree
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 8:32:13 PM

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I agree with O. Wilde : A great deal of sincerity is fatal, especially with your boss !Think
jmacann
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 9:26:25 PM
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paula veigel and Faith sacrafic -welcome to the forum!
kitten
Posted: Tuesday, December 06, 2011 11:49:59 PM

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Daemon wrote:
A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)



I looked for this quote early this morning but could only find it as a quote. It comes from, The Critic as Artist, part 2, 1891. I looked on Gutenberg and my ususal haunts to find this. I do believe it is sourced correctly even though I came across something similiar in his work, The Picture of Dorian Gray. And it is something, Lord Henry "Harry" Wotton, would have said.

Tonight I finally found from where the quote comes. The piece was orginally entitled, The True Function and Value of Criticism. And is about fifteen pages long. The quote is also said to have come from, Intentions published in 1888??????Think Found it in Gutenberg under the orginal title, Intentions--1888--*fourth and final section*

The information for, Oscar Wilde, is below as well as the first page summary. Also below is a link for, the Three Wise Monkeys. There is a difference between western and eastern thought, which is not surprising. And there can be a fourth monkey as well which I never knew but I like the idea of.


THE CRITIC AS ARTIST: WITH SOME REMARKS UPON THE IMPORTANCE OF DOING NOTHING

A DIALOGUE. Part II. Persons: Gilbert and Ernest. Scene: the library of a house in Piccadilly, overlooking the Green Park.


ERNEST. Well, I should say that a critic should above all things be fair.

GILBERT. Ah! not fair. A critic cannot be fair in the ordinary sense of the word. It is only about things that do not interest one that one can give a really unbiassed opinion, which is no doubt the reason why an unbiassed opinion is always absolutely valueless. The man who sees both sides of a question, is a man who sees absolutely nothing at all. Art is a passion, and, in matters of art, Thought is inevitably coloured by emotion, and so is fluid rather than fixed, and, depending upon fine moods and exquisite moments, cannot be narrowed into the rigidity of a scientific formula or a theological dogma. It is to the soul that Art speaks, and the soul may be made the prisoner of the mind as well as of the body. One should, of course, have no prejudices; but, as a great Frenchman remarked a hundred years ago, it is one’s business in such matters to have preferences, and when one has preferences one ceases to be fair. It is only an auctioneer who can equally and impartially admire all schools of Art. No; fairness is not one of the qualities of the true critic. It is not even a condition of criticism. Each form of Art with which we come in contact dominates us for the moment to the exclusion of every other form. We must surrender ourselves absolutely to the work in question, whatever it may be, if we wish to gain its secret. For the time, we must think of nothing else, can think of nothing else, indeed.

ERNEST. The true critic will be rational, at any rate, will he not?

GILBERT. Rational? There are two ways of disliking art, Ernest. One is to dislike it. The other, to like it rationally. For Art, as Plato saw, and not without regret, creates in listener and spectator a form of divine madness. It does not spring from inspiration, but it makes others inspired. Reason is not the faculty to which it appeals. If one loves Art at all, one must love it beyond all other things in the world, and against such love, the reason, if one listened to it, would cry out. There is nothing sane about the worship of beauty. It is too splendid to be sane. Those of whose lives it forms the dominant note will always seem to the world to be pure visionaries.

ERNEST. Well, at least, the critic will be sincere.

GILBERT. A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal. The true critic will, indeed, always be sincere in his devotion to the principle of beauty, but he will seek for beauty in every age and in each school, and will never suffer himself to be limited to any settled custom of thought or stereotyped mode of looking at things. He will realise himself in many forms, and by a thousand different ways, and will ever be curious of new sensations and fresh points of view. Through constant change, and through constant change alone, he will find his true unity. He will not consent to be the slave of his own opinions. For what is mind but motion in the intellectual sphere? The essence of thought, as the essence of life, is growth. You must not be frightened by word, Ernest. What people call insincerity is simply a method by which we can multiply our personalities.

ERNEST. I am afraid I have not been fortunate in my suggestions.




Criticism of Art: Form in Oscar Wilde's Critical Writing

Intentions--1888

Three wise monkeys *and a fourth*


Please thank, wikipedia and http://www.jstor.org for the above information. And Project Gutenberg for the Intentions to read at your leisure. I found it to be a very interesting read but that is just my opinion.


peace out, >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
almostfreebird
Posted: Wednesday, December 07, 2011 4:10:59 AM

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Jimbob wrote:
almostfreebird wrote:
[quote=Jimbob]The three wise monkeys, see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil. In western Culture (not Japanese culture) the three wise monkeys could be considered to be a little insincere by "looking the other way" so to speak.

note : sometimes a forth monkey (Japanese).


Jimbo, speak fitly, or be silent. Wise-ass.

It's Jimbob not jimbo further more I don't take kindly to your brief insulting remark.




I think I misunderstood something; I read it as " sometimes sitting by the three monkeys is a Japanese."



GabhSigenod
Posted: Wednesday, December 07, 2011 8:34:11 AM

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Cross your arms whenever possible. Thanks kitten.

Mise, tá mé lán de dea-fhortún.
pRiNCeSsa
Posted: Sunday, December 18, 2011 7:39:00 PM

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Location: piLipiNaS
i gueSs i fiNd tRuTh iN thiSThink ... wheN y0u'Re siNceRe, y0u aRe iN daNgeR 0f gettiNg diSapp0iNtedBrick wall iN the eNd...

buT maYbe i'm juSt feeLiNg a LittLe depReSsed todaYd'oh! ...
dusty
Posted: Tuesday, July 02, 2013 11:08:58 PM

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of course the timing may not allow for a person to be completely honest at all times, but Wilde seems to use it as an excuse for his lies.

Absolute, is a strong word, and to consider full sincerity to be absolutely fatal, is to assume that society chooses not to do away with men. When there are no men around and society can function harmoniously, sincerity is almost never a bad thing except for certain instances of poor timing for it, and of course the sincerity of an idiot. For a foolish person does not know themselves well enough nor can they recognize a sincere emotion, so it is impossible to such a man to be sincere in the first place. Not only does he not understand himself, he fails to understand the entire world from that viewpoint.

Honesty and sincerity once a person understands how not to use truth as a weapon, once a society becomes socially advanced, is needed in order to survive. It's typical of males of any species to not comprehend that knowledgeable people will always be aware of insincerity, females have no problem understanding that concept.

It is the reason that males either must learn to be honest, or they will be removed from society, as is done in the order of hymenoptera. So Wilde's quote would ring true in a dysfunctional society where males have not reformed or been removed, and it is precisely why they must be removed

If there is one thing that damages a society more than anything, it is for members of said society to use another person's sincerity against them.

A society that is not allowed to speak sincere thoughts will not survive the ages.

To be concerned of the fate of the world is not bad, but bearing false witness is to not be
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