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Money dignifies what is frivolous if unpaid for. Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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Money dignifies what is frivolous if unpaid for.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)
jmacann
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 4:43:33 AM
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You only need to be stupid enough to want it.
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 4:48:23 AM

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jmacann wrote:
You only need to be stupid enough to want it.


Which part of "paid for" don't you understand? Think

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
uuaschbaer
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 5:34:35 AM

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leonAzul wrote:
jmacann wrote:
You only need to be stupid enough to want it.


Which part of "paid for" don't you understand? Think


I don't understand youd'oh!

*
kitten
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 6:20:37 AM

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Daemon wrote:
Money dignifies what is frivolous if unpaid for.

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941)



The essay, A Room on One's Own, was first published on 24 October 1929. The essay was based on a series of lectures, Virginia Woolf, gave in October 1928 at two women's colleges at Cambridge University. The two colleges priviledged to hear her lectures were, Girton College established in 1869 and Newnham College founded in 1871.*

A Room of One's Own is generally seen or viewed as 'a feminist text' or body of work.



Women's Access to Education

The title of the essay comes from Woolf's conception that, 'a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction'.[3] Woolf notes that women have been kept from writing because of their relative poverty, and financial freedom will bring women the freedom to write; "In the first place, to have a room of her own..was out of the question, unless her parents were exceptionally rich or very noble".[4] The title also refers to any author's need for poetic license and the personal liberty to create art.

The essay examines whether women were capable of producing, and in fact free to produce work of the quality of William Shakespeare, addressing the limitations that past and present women writers face.

Woolf's father, Sir Leslie Stephen, in line with the thinking of the era, believed that only the boys of the family should be sent to school. Because her father did not believe in investing in the education of his daughters, Woolf was left without the experience of formal schooling. In delivering the lectures outline in the essay, Woolf is speaking to women who have the opportunity to learn in a formal, communal setting. Woolf lets her audience know the importance of their education at the same time warning them of the precariousness of their position in society.



"Hundreds of women began as their eighteenth century drew on to add to their pin money, or to come to the rescue of their families by making translations or writing the innumerable bad novels which have ceased to be recorded even in text-books, but are to be picked up in the fourpenny boxes in the Charing Cross Road. The extreme activity of mind which showed itself in the later eighteenth century among women - the talking, and the meeting, the writing of essays on Shakespeare, the translating of the classics - was founded on the solid fact that women could make money by writing. Money dignifies what is frivolous if unpaid for. It might still be well to sneer at 'blue stocking with an itch for scribbling', but it could not be denied that they could pit money in their purses. Thus, towards the end of the eighteenth century a change came about which, if I were rewriting history, I should describe more fully and think of greater importance than the Crusades or the Wars of the Roses. The middle-class woman began to write. For if Pride and Prejudice matters, and Middlemarch and Villette and Wuthering Heights matter, then it matters far more than I can prove in an hour's discourse that women generally, and not merely the lonely aristocrat shut up in her country house among her folios and her flatterers, took to writing. Without those forerunners, Jane Austen and the Brontës and George Eliot could no more have written than Shakespeare could have written without Marlowe, or Marlowe without Chaucer, or Chaucer without those forgotten poets who paved the ways and tamed the natural savagery of the tongue. For masterpieces are not single and solitary births; they are the outcome of many years of thinking in common, of thinking by the body of the people, so that the experience of the mass is behind the single voice. Jane Austen should have laid a wreath upon the grave of Fanny Burney, George Eliot done homage to the robust shade of Eliza Carter - the valiant old woman who tied a bell to her bedstead in order that she might wake early to learn Greek. All women together ought to let flowers fall upon the tomb of Aphra Behn, which is, most scandalously but rather appropriately, in Westminster Abbey, for it was she who earned them the right to speak their minds. It is she - shady and amorous as she was - who makes it not quite fantastic for me to say to you tonight: Earn five hundred a year by your wits."


Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own



Please thank Wikipedia for background as to the colleges she lectured at and their importance, as well as comments on a "Woman's Access to Education," and her father's beliefs.

Also please thank http://apieceofmonologue.com for her thoughts and the quote in context. "A Piece of Monologue, [is] an independent website that specializes in literature, philosophy and critical theory."

I am curious as to how she thought/believed women were able to accomplish the art or writing. The idea of earing five hundred a year was a vast sum to earn at writing be it male or female and most women made extra with 'butter and egg money and using the thread and needle.'


peace out, >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
GabhSigenod
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 10:32:17 AM

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The 'butter and egg money and using the thread and needle' still look good today.

Mise, tá mé lán de dea-fhortún.
jmacann
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 10:43:17 AM
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I understood quite alright -thanks, anyway. I do not share her standpoint.

It seems only uuaschbaer got the point I was making for (my fault, surely); 'if one is smart enough to get all that money, one must be stupid enough to want it' (cannot remember where I read something rather similar).

A very sharp point, indeed. Cheers.
uuaschbaer
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 1:01:45 PM

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I'm for the empowerment of women, though.

Incidentally, why should writing and translating texts be frivolous unless you have no food or no home? And so how does money redeem the frivolity of writing by the virtue of writing? Why would art require consensus? And what's wrong with natural savagery of tongue? It sounds great to me if that'd avoid phrases like 'the natural savagery of the tongue.'

*
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 1:31:30 PM

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jmacann wrote:
I understood quite alright -thanks, anyway. I do not share her standpoint.


If you think it is a "standpoint" then it missed you entirely. It is an observation.

To put it more plainly, society takes an activity more seriously when it is pursued as a profession than as a hobby. There is nothing speculative about that observation.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
excaelis
Posted: Saturday, November 12, 2011 2:21:13 PM

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It's been my experience that money rarely dignifies anything. I give you " Jersey Shore '...

Sanity is not statistical
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