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he would be willing to have a shortened service." Options
A cooperator
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 10:28:45 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 3,553
Neurons: 13,359
Location: Seiyun, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi everyone,
I always face like this sentence "When he entered the church, he found that there was only one man there, so he inquired whether he would be willing to have a shortened service."

NOTE: I quoted that sentece from some story book and I think not necessary to name its name.

Which tense is that phrase that I underlinded in the above example? Is it a conditional tense? If yes, then where is the a condition.

Peace,


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
kazi
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 11:51:27 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/16/2010
Posts: 34
Neurons: 95
A cooperator wrote:
Hi everyone,
I always face like this sentence "When he entered the church, he found that there was only one man there, so he inquired whether he would be willing to have a shortened service."

NOTE: I quoted that sentece from some story book and I think not necessary to name its name.

Which tense is that phrase that I underlinded in the above example? Is it a conditional tense? If yes, then where is the a condition.

Peace,


"would be willing to have" = future
Gram Gram
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 1:19:27 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/25/2011
Posts: 44
Neurons: 132
Location: United States, WA
Because he entered the church... which denote something that happened in the past

Thus: ..."he would be willing to havea..." indicates it is the past perfect tense.

The past perfect (pp) tense is the most difficult to learn in any language. It combines a word that may be used the future like "would be" with a sentence that has occured in the past.
Shivanand
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 2:08:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 7,902
Neurons: 229,316
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
I always face like this sentence "When he entered the church, he found that there was only one man there, so he inquired whether he would be willing to have a shortened service."

I am of the opinion that it is not prudent to judge the tense of a whole paragraph! This will meet with disastrous consequences! As for as the underlined sentence is concerned though it's conditional, it is future simple tense! It may be noted that have in the sentence is used as a verb and not as an auxiliary as in a perfect tense!

Cheers!!

कर्मण्येवाधिकारस्ते मा फलेषु कदाचन। मा कर्मफलहेतुर्भूर्मा ते संगोऽस्त्वकर्मणि॥
kazi
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 6:40:30 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/16/2010
Posts: 34
Neurons: 95
We have to understand that, a third person is in an effort narrating or reporting what tanspired batweeen two persons in a church. This third person did not ask the question. So the asker might have asked something like this " would you be willing to have a shortened service?" (future). If the asker had asked "are you willing to have a shortened service?" The third person would have reported that he asked if "he was willing to have a shortened service..." (which would be present continous and past continous respectively.
A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 9:40:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 3,553
Neurons: 13,359
Location: Seiyun, Hadramawt, Yemen
kazi wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
Hi everyone,
I always face like this sentence "When he entered the church, he found that there was only one man there, so he inquired whether he would be willing to have a shortened service."

NOTE: I quoted that sentece from some story book and I think not necessary to name its name.

Which tense is that phrase that I underlinded in the above example? Is it a conditional tense? If yes, then where is the a condition.

Peace,


"would be willing to have" = future

If it is future, then this "he will be willing to have ...." what is it, isn't it future progressive? if yes, then what kind of future is "would be willing to have"?

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 10:08:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 3,553
Neurons: 13,359
Location: Seiyun, Hadramawt, Yemen
shivanand wrote:
I always face like this sentence "When he entered the church, he found that there was only one man there, so he inquired whether he would be willing to have a shortened service."

I am of the opinion that it is not prudent to judge the tense of a whole paragraph! This will meet with disastrous consequences! As for as the underlined sentence is concerned though it's conditional, it is future simple tense! It may be noted that have in the sentence is used as a verb and not as an auxiliary as in a perfect tense!

Cheers!!

If it is conditional, then where is the condition? And I noticed that you mentioned that it is future simple tense, I don't quite agree with you because if it is future then I would be a future progressive tense , please have a look at my sentence, especially, in " would be willing" and this is the form of future progressive "will be +ing".

And because that "will" became "would" then I would be calling it with " past of future progressive tense" I know this is not find in the tenses but I concluded form myself because I have exhausted from tha asking about this question and I didn't find any persuasive answer.

I hope you understand me

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
IMcRout
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 7:59:45 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,382
Neurons: 563,379
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Present Progressive: he is willing
Future Progressive: he will be willing
Conditional: he would be willing



The situation as I understand it:

Priest enters church and finds only one visitor.
Priest asks visitor, " [In view of the fact that you are the only visitor] would you be willing / agree to have a shortened service?"
[Implicit condition. "If I asked you"]

Put into reported or indirect speech (as in your example):

[The priest] inquired whether he would be willing to ....

As the question is already in the conditional form, there is no tense shift from direct speech.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Hope1
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 9:20:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/31/2011
Posts: 1,163
Neurons: 3,352
As Imc said - conditional progressive -

The conditional progressive is formed as 'would + be + present participle'. PP is infinitive + ing.
This construction is used in the main clause of conditional sentences. It puts emphasis on a course of action
that might take place.

I would be going
He would be willing.
Etc.


Every man has a right to his opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts. Bernard M. Baruch 1870-1965
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