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There are only two styles of portrait painting, the serious and the smirk. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, October 31, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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There are only two styles of portrait painting, the serious and the smirk.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
kitten
Posted: Monday, October 31, 2011 1:31:28 AM

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Daemon wrote:
There are only two styles of portrait painting, the serious and the smirk.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)



The above comes from the serial, Nicholas Nickleby--1838-1839. It is the third of his novels. The quote in context is from, CHAPTER 10, entitled--How Mr Ralph Nickleby provided for his Niece and Sister-in-Law.


Kate Nickleby: Nicholas's younger sister. Kate is a fairly passive character, typical of Dickensian women, but she shares some of her brother’s fortitude and strong will.

Miss La Creevy: The Nicklebys' landlady. A small, kindly (if somewhat ridiculous) woman in her fifties, she is a miniature-portrait painter. She is the first friend the Nicklebys make in London, and one of the truest.



'Why, my dear, you are right there,' said Miss La Creevy, 'in the main you are right there; though I don't allow that it is of such very great importance in the present case. Ah! The difficulties of Art, my dear, are great.'

'They must be, I have no doubt,' said Kate, humouring her good-natured little friend.

'They are beyond anything you can form the faintest conception of,' replied Miss La Creevy. 'What with bringing out eyes with all one's power, and keeping down noses with all one's force, and adding to heads, and taking away teeth altogether, you have no idea of the trouble one little miniature is.'

'The remuneration can scarcely repay you,' said Kate.

'Why, it does not, and that's the truth,' answered Miss La Creevy; 'and then people are so dissatisfied and unreasonable, that, nine times out of ten, there's no pleasure in painting them. Sometimes they say, "Oh, how very serious you have made me look, Miss La Creevy!" and at others, "La, Miss La Creevy, how very smirking!" when the very essence of a good portrait is, that it must be either serious or smirking, or it's no portrait at all.'

'Indeed!' said Kate, laughing.

'Certainly, my dear; because the sitters are always either the one or the other,' replied Miss La Creevy. 'Look at the Royal Academy! All those beautiful shiny portraits of gentlemen in black velvet waistcoats, with their fists doubled up on round tables, or marble slabs, are serious, you know; and all the ladies who are playing with little parasols, or little dogs, or little children—it's the same rule in art, only varying the objects—are smirking. In fact,' said Miss La Creevy, sinking her voice to a confidential whisper, 'there are only two styles of portrait painting; the serious and the smirk; and we always use the serious for professional people (except actors sometimes), and the smirk for private ladies and gentlemen who don't care so much about looking clever.'



Please thank wikiquotes for the women in character and Project Gutenburg for the quote in context.


peace out, >^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
jmacann
Posted: Monday, October 31, 2011 4:54:42 AM
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However, the pleasure is granted -fortunately enough.
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Monday, October 31, 2011 7:55:59 AM
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Is that then the genius of Davinci's Mona Lisa - that's she has a serious smirk?
Hupomone
Posted: Monday, October 31, 2011 9:22:39 AM
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For me, portrait paintings are either numbered or abstract, and they cause serious smirks.
jmacann
Posted: Monday, October 31, 2011 10:24:21 AM
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[quote JG]

Quite so -as I said, the pleasure is granted. Very likely, both sitter and painter enjoyed those days. As for the musicians, let's hope they were enticed by watching the scene -if, after all, there were any engaged.
Christine
Posted: Monday, October 31, 2011 5:05:23 PM

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A good Halloween site!

I am carrying my heart~I am carrying my rhythm~I am carrying my prayers~But you can't kill my spirit~It's soaring and strong (Paula Cole's Me Lyrics)***We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We ARE spirtual beings having a human experience.(T.deChardin)***There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle. (Albert Einstein)



GabhSigenod
Posted: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 7:10:37 AM

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Daemon wrote:
There are only two styles of portrait painting, the serious and the smirk.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)

-
Would this concept apply to the nude model and sculptor?

Mise, tá mé lán de dea-fhortún.
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