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prince
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 7:05:50 AM
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What does it mean by American colonies

Does it mean that foreigner ruling Americans or Americans ruling locals.


Kindly clear off my dout

Thanks and regards
Yours,Prince
thar
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 7:13:27 AM

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depending on the date it was talking about, it could be the [American] colonies of Britain, or the colonies that belonged to America (Phippines, Guam etc)

Most likely it is the colonies (eg of Britain), that are in America. It would normally be implied elsewhere in the writing, who owned the colonies, eg Britain or France. Or Viking!

I am not sure the Americans used the term colonies for its overseas possessions, as the word would have had specific meaning for Americans! Also colonies suggests lands where your own people settle (eg Australia, America) not lands where you have political power over the local population. By the time the US was a world power it did not colonise any other places with its own people.
prince
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 7:34:34 AM
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Mr Thar kindly let me know What is the definition of American colonies of Britain

Thank you
thar
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 8:51:01 AM

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You might do better when the world turns another 90 degrees and the Americans come online. But basically the British set up several colonies, and from the beginning I think they separated themselves, hence colonies not just one colony. When the Americans won their independence from Britain, those colonies became the original states (the stripes in the flag) and as the US evolved and went west, more states were added.

The French also had colonies in the Americas (Louisiana, Quebec) and if you include the West Indies, there were also Dutch, Spanish etc. So not just British.

(sorry if this is not quite right, I am not very knowledgeable about American history!)

Orson Burleigh
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:11:11 AM

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The large British Colonies of North America included Newfoundland and Labrador (based on claims of early explorers and the 13 Atlantic Seaboard colonies, settled or otherwise acquired by the British, (New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia) which broke away to be the United States. Canada, then comprising much the modern Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario, was acquired from France as a result the Seven Years War.

In central America the Scots, prior to the establishment of the United Kingdom, briefly settled a colony called Darien in what is now Panama. A much later mainland Central America British Colony was British Honduras, now independent as Belize.

The British also colonized Bermuda and, with varying degrees of success, contested Spanish and French claims to and control of large and small islands in the Caribbean.
Orson Burleigh
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:30:03 AM

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Thar,

Thanks for posting that excellent map. As you point out the Dutch were also involved in early European colonization. They founded the City of Nieuw Amsterdam as the Capital of their Nieuw Netherlands colony. Both were renamed New York after being taken by the British.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:47:00 AM

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New Sweden

By the middle of the 17th century the Realm of Sweden had reached its greatest territorial extent and was one of the great powers of Europe. Sweden then included Finland and Estonia along with parts of modern Russia, Poland, Germany and Latvia. The Swedes sought to expand their influence by creating an agricultural (tobacco) and fur-trading colony to bypass French and English merchants. The New Sweden Company was chartered and included Swedish, Dutch and German stockholders.

The first Swedish expedition to North America embarked from the port of Gothenburg in late 1637. It was organized and overseen by Clas Fleming, a Swedish Admiral from Finland. A Dutchman, Samuel Blommaert, assisted the fitting-out and appointed Peter Minuit to lead the expedition. The members of the expedition, aboard the ships Fogel Grip and Kalmar Nyckel, sailed into Delaware Bay, which lay within the territory claimed by the Dutch, passing Cape May and Cape Henlopen in late March 1638, and anchored at a rocky point on the Minquas Kill that is known today as Swedes' Landing on March 29, 1638. They built a fort on the present site of the city of Wilmington, which they named Fort Christina, after Queen Christina of Sweden.




In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 9:49:06 AM

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ha, just got to wonder what took them all so long, what was wrong with those lazy Southerners! Dancing



edit - I posted that before I saw JJ's new Sweden, so I was insulting purely the French (?Normans) British (Norsemen) and Dutch. I must admit I had forgotten the Dutch New York (Haarlem, I assume). Would the world be a different place if Sweden had colonised the Americas? Or would things have turned out the same and the old Swedish lands would be different?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 11:17:00 AM

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You are all forgetting Saint Brendan! An Irish navigator of the 5th century, who went over the Atlantic, found a land with volcanoes, then carried on and found a country where every tree bore edible fruit and the sheep were as big as cows!

Sounds a little like "The streets are paved with gold and everyone is rich" to me!

So America is really a Celtic/Gaelic colony - never mind these Johnny-come-lately Norsemen.

Dancing

What say GabhSigenod?

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 11:50:38 AM

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give it another few hours and we may get a chinese claim!

But the lazy sods walked it!



but apparently they didn't like the food, so they went back home!

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 12:12:24 PM

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That's cheating!! - walking - Huh!

Ah, but - the Chinese didn't exist 35000 years ago. So there!

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
jcbarros
Posted: Tuesday, October 25, 2011 12:36:02 PM

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Cursed Columbus!
Romany
Posted: Friday, October 28, 2011 6:18:34 AM
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Dragonspeaker -

Well perhaps not - but they DID colonise America in 1421(In fact there is evidence that Columbus actually made use of maps which originated from Chinese navigators)... as well as many other places including Australia and New Zealand.

Imagine how chagrined Chinese botanists must have been when, at Reform and Opening in 1981, they discovered that the Chinese fruit they had planted in one of those colonies hundreds of years ago had flourished and grown so well that when it had been 'discovered' by Europeans it had been named "Kiwi" Fruit!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, October 28, 2011 12:37:33 PM

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Romany wrote:
Imagine how chagrined Chinese botanists must have been when, at Reform and Opening in 1981, they discovered that the Chinese fruit they had planted in one of those colonies hundreds of years ago had flourished and grown so well that when it had been 'discovered' by Europeans it had been named "Kiwi" Fruit!

Fruit? Damn it! - I thought they were kiwi eggs! Dancing

Actually, I first knew them as 'Chinese gooseberries' - though they are neither gooseberries nor goose eggs.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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