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There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.

Jane Austen (1775-1817)
GabhSigenod
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 8:52:01 AM

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You can't stay young on your island forever.

Mise, tá mé lán de dea-fhortún.
pedro
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 8:54:53 AM

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Ah those nostalgic Molotov cocktail parties..

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
Peaceward
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 12:50:26 PM
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On my own risk I would dare to paraphrase Jane's to look at that what will happen

"There is something so amiable in the prejudices of an adult mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions", On my view there is even stronger emotional coloration in this variant.

Original one: "There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions. Jane Austen


What goes around, comes around.
percivalpecksniff
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 12:55:13 PM

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Ah but Peaceward it is not the young who hold more general opinions therefore your corruption of the quote does not work.

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle
tenderwander
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 2:25:05 PM
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Can anyone help to explain more about this quote? Why is it amiable that the young adults are less open to genenral opinions? Which general opinions? And who is not prejudiced?

percivalpecksniff
Posted: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 2:48:42 PM

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Well the young are not yet set in their ways and challenge generally held views before succuming to them as the grow older. It is sometimes refreshing to be in the company of unfettered minds, so to speak.

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle
tenderwander
Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2011 10:15:22 AM
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Thanks, pervivalpecksniff. That makes a lot of sense.

Please let me know if I am right about this...the word "prejudice" in Jane Austen's time had a different connotation than it has nowadays.

Would it make more sense if we think about her use of "predudice" as "ideology?"
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