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throw up in the way of... Options
Amarillide
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 5:22:15 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 10
Neurons: 115
Hi there!
I am struggling to understand the meaning of the expression "throw up in the way of...", I feel like it could have nearly opposite meanings.

This is the phrase:
"I decided not to discard everything this method would throw up in the way of similarities, oppositions, and change of meaning."
I am not sure if the meaning is (in other words):
- I will accept everything that will come up, like/in terms of similarities, oppositions and changes of meaning.
Either
- I will accept everything that will come up while discussing/while trying to reach/on my way to similarities, oppositions and changes of meaning.
Or it may have a completely different meaning that I am neglecting here...

Thank you, I would really appreciate your help,
Ama
thar
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 6:02:41 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

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everything this method would throw up

- the wide variety of things it would produce

in the way of similarities, etc

- in the category of similarities etc

phrasal verb to throw up

throw up
2
TRANSITIVE ​BRITISH
to produce something new or unexpected
This system has thrown up a few problems.

https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/throw-up#throw-up__3


in the way of
a set phrase
of that sort, that kind of thing

Quote:
in the way of
PHRASE
DEFINITIONS1
1
if there is not much in the way of something, there is not much of that particular thing
What is there in the way of tools?
He doesn’t have much in the way of education.


https://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/in-the-way-of


Amarillide
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 6:49:21 AM
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That's great!
Thank you very much for your extremely clear and explicative answer!
Ama
thar
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2020 6:55:25 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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Glad I could help. I realise I didn't quite answer for the entirety, just gave a pointer to those parts you highlighted.

The other point is that structure 'not discard everything' means 'do keep some of it'
ie it is the entire verb phrase that is negated
to discard everything = throw all of it out
not to "discard everything" = keep some of it. Discard some but not all of it.
I am guessing you got that, but just in case.
Amarillide
Posted: Saturday, February 15, 2020 1:54:59 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 10
Neurons: 115
Hello Thar,
thank you so much... yes, I think I got that, but help and nuances, especially in this very context, are always welcome!
Thank you for your time,
Ama
tautophile
Posted: Saturday, February 15, 2020 1:13:26 PM
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Joined: 3/14/2018
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Neurons: 5,594
The problem with using the expression "throw up" is that "throw up" is much more commonly used to mean "vomit"--which plainly is not what is meant in the original sentence. May I suggest "I decided not to discard everything this method would give in the way of similarities, oppositions, and change of meaning" or something similar, like "...everything that applying this method would give..."
Amarillide
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 3:57:50 AM
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Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 10
Neurons: 115
Hello Tautophile,
Thank you, but I didn't write the phrase, I was just trying to understand its meaning.
The meaning of "vomiting" was the only one I knew before this phrase. That's very interesting, does your post suggests that the phrase, because of the other meaning of "throwing up", may somehow sound not very refined or polite?
Ama
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 4:00:50 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Amarillide wrote:
Hello Tautophile,
Thank you, but I didn't write the phrase, I was just trying to understand its meaning.
The meaning of "vomiting" was the only one I knew before this phrase. That's very interesting, does your post suggests that the phrase, because of the other meaning of "throwing up", may somehow sound not very refined or polite?
Ama


No it’s perfectly fine to use “throwing up problems” it’s not rude or impolite, it’s a common usage.
Context will tell us if it was used to refer to problems or vomiting I would hesitate to use it.
Amarillide
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 4:43:45 AM
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Joined: 2/13/2020
Posts: 10
Neurons: 115
Cool! Thank you, everyone!
This forum is fantastic!
Ama
tautophile
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 6:49:20 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 179
Neurons: 5,594
It's pretty evident that the writer of the original sentence was thinking of "throw up" as meaning "produce something new or unexpected" (see Thar's comment). But the use of the term "throw up" has a good chance of causing the sentence to be misunderstood because the other, and very different meaning, "vomit", is much better known. To me, the problem with using "throw up" in the sentence was the potential for that misunderstanding, rather than any potential lack of refinement or politeness.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Monday, February 17, 2020 1:11:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
tautophile wrote:
It's pretty evident that the writer of the original sentence was thinking of "throw up" as meaning "produce something new or unexpected" (see Thar's comment). But the use of the term "throw up" has a good chance of causing the sentence to be misunderstood because the other, and very different meaning, "vomit", is much better known. To me, the problem with using "throw up" in the sentence was the potential for that misunderstanding, rather than any potential lack of refinement or politeness.


To me it is not a problem English hands many words that have two different meanings and which one is meant has to be chosen by looking at context.
Throw up meaning to produce problems is not such an obscure phrase that people would misunderstand what is meant in a sentence such as the original one.
thar
Posted: Monday, February 17, 2020 5:09:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 21,386
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Yes, to throw up problems is like if a wheel throws up stones - they come at you unexpectedly.


The text looks like it is talking about the result of a search function, which is producing a range of results, not all of which are relevant.
So that is more like regurgitate - the computer spews out these results.
But that is looking deeper at the connection if metaphorical and literal meanings.
I agree the phrase is so common in its various forms there would be no confusion in this context.

You throw up a fence.
(Build it quickly)

I throw up my hands
(raise my arms in a gesture of frustration)

You throw up the keys.
You throw the keys up.
(Chuck them to someone at the upstairs window)

The search throws up results.
(Generates, produces)

And
You throw up your breakfast.
(Vomit)

All clear in context, whether phrasal or literal.
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