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Traditional dishes Options
Aliya111
Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 3:49:04 AM

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Location: Almaty, Almaty Qalasy, Kazakhstan
What is the traditional dish in your country?
whatson
Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 7:37:10 AM
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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
*
Instead of waiting for the slowpokes
of all the countries and regions of the world to reply,
you should try this site:
https://www.adducation.info/lifestyle/international-cuisine/
tautophile
Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 11:05:44 AM
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I agree with Whatson. Most large or populous or ethnically diverse countries have different "traditional" dishes in different parts of the country.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 5:54:15 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Many of the counties of England have their own traditional dishes mine is Bedfordshire Clanger.


http://www.friendsofbedfordshire.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/BedfordshireClanger.pdf
Quote:
Bedfordshire Clanger
A Bedfordshire Clanger is a long, thin suet pastry based dish with a sweet and a savoury end. It was traditionally cooked by boiling rather than baking, which is the modern approach to this traditional farm labourer’s meal. This recipe is for a pork and apple combination but many versions are now sold with many different filling combinations.
Preparation Time: 30 minutes Cooking Time: 55 minutes
Ingredients
450g pre-made suet pastry 1 egg, beaten
For the savoury filling: 1 small onion, chopped 1 tbsp lard
225g minced pork
1 tsp dried sage
1 cooking apples
50g cooked peas
salt and fresh ground black pepper
For the sweet filling:
2 dessert apples
50g Dates, stoned and chopped grated rind of 1 orange
55g sultanas
2 tbsp caster sugar


It was made to be eaten in the fields for lunch and has a quite hard texture on the outside.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 8:29:04 PM

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Once upon a time, the people of my country were so hungry that when they found a Greenland shark that had been dead for months, rotten and buried in the sand, they ate it. Which was a very stupid thing to do, because they knew that Greenland shark is very poisonous to eat. But they didn't die!
(Whistle just kidding)
Tweak the recipe a little - it turns out being beheaded, buried for months in the sand and compressed with rocks drives out the poison from the shark.
So there you are. Hákarl - available at all good shops, and bad ones as well.







It makes me laugh sometimes that people are so keen to eat authentic 'peasant food'. No insult to any 'peasants' who have ever lived - they do their best to generate tasty food from the meagre resources they have - but by definition it is what the poorest section of society can afford in order not to starve!

Not everyone is a fan of hákarl, although many people like it. Best in small quantities - eaten on skewers, and washed down with lots of alcohol.
The hákarl is the pale cubes in the bowl.



Much more common - you eat it at feasts an celebrations and in restaurants, is boiled sheep's head.




Quote:
As a heads up, upon first encountering hákarl, one should expect a full-on assault on the nostrils from a putrid smell that is reminiscent of rotten cheese mixed with ammonia. If one survives the gag-inducing smell, he or she may feel brave enough to try and sample this fermented shark flesh.

This is highly discouraged for outsiders, however, if one dares to be so bold, he or she must be sure to prepare to torture the taste buds by consuming what is perhaps the most unimaginable, rancid thing on planet earth.

Kæstur Hákarl, or hákarl for short, is prepared through a time-honored process. The same process used in Viking times is still used today.

First, the shark is beheaded.

Then, to eliminate poisons, such as trimethylamine oxide and uric acid (a compound found in urine), a shallow hole is dug in the sand and the hákarl is placed in it with stones, sand, and gravel placed on top. The pressure of the stones causes liquids to seep out over a period of 6-12 weeks, a time frame that allows the shark to ferment properly.

After this, the fermented shark - which is 24 feet long on average - is taken out of the ground, cut into long pieces and hung up to dry for several months.

Many hákarl preparers claim they know the meat is ready just by the smell and once a characteristic dry, brown crust forms. When the time is right, the pieces are taken down, the crust is removed and the meat is cut into slices and served and enjoyed by many.

Today to get hákarl, you don't need to bury your own shark, it can be purchased as a prepared food in Icelandic grocery stores.



This being the medical section, I though you were looking for traditional medicines. So here is the less serious answer to that question. Iceland had prohibition (ban on sale of alcohol), in the same way as the US, but there was an exception for spirits prescribed for medical conditions. It was amazing how many illnesses could be cured with the judicious use of alcohol! Doctors, as members of the community, acted to subvert the entire system. Eventually the ban was lifted on wine (Spain threatened to stop importing Icelandic fish unless Icelnd accepted Spanish wine, so it was actually economic blackmail that ended prohibition) then later, spirits and low alcohol beer. Full strenght beer was still banned so bars just sold low strength beer with spirits in! Finally full strength beer became legal only in 1989.


Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Monday, February 3, 2020 10:24:06 AM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
There is nothing like the dishes made from the following vegetables with butter, Cumin seeds, Oregano, common salt, green cardamom, and other light spices. This food contains a lot of fiber, vitamins, minerals that clear the intestine, colon and rectum. Vitamins found in organic vegetables inhibit cancer cells from cancer disease.

hedy mmm
Posted: Monday, February 3, 2020 3:29:21 PM

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Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Aliya111 wrote:
What is the traditional dish in your country?

Hi Aliya 111,
Firstly, I will say welcome Aliya11 to TFD’s forum!Dancing
Secondly, I will attempt to answer your question ...I am from the USA born and raised in New York... we have so many cultures, ethnic backgrounds, varieties of traditional dishes and delicacies—that would please your palate—one can choose to enjoy a different ethnic dish everyday! I am of German & Puerto Rican extraction, however, I have a plethora of dishes I enjoy cooking...my daughter-in-law, who’s Italian prefers my meatballs over her mom’s...(yikes!) I love avocados, plantains, mangos, beans, chicken... chick peas, feta, hummus, all veggies with butter, or a béchamel sauce... and salads with onions, cilantro, watercress...live food...(except okra, I just can’t handle the taste...yuck!) ...recently a friend in Russia sent me a recipe that has the same ingredients as my own!

Ashwin Joshi wrote:
There is nothing like the dishes made from the following vegetables with butter, cumin seeds, oregano, common salt, green cardamom, and other light spices. This food contains a lot of fiber, vitamins, minerals that clear the intestine, colon and rectum. Vitamins found in organic vegetables inhibit cancer cells from cancer disease.

Hi Ashwin Joshi....you are absolutely correct there is nothing like those vegetables in your photo, especially the garlic, sweet potatoes, kiwi, persimmons, beans, mushrooms sweet peppers.. I like cumin (we latinos call it comino), salt, pepper, garlic, and of course oregano and most of the ingredients you mentioned, (except green cardamom which I’m not familiar with)...and as far as your summary, I say correctomundo...they provide lots of fiber, vitamins, minerals, roughage...good for your brain, heart, lungs, kidneys and digestive system, teeth, hair... to name a few!... Sadly, too many foods are now being contaminated with genetically modified organisms which eventually could kill the bee population... because bees do not like the taste of flowers that are GMO so they starve & they can’t produce honey...that’s why the bee population has been on the decline...
There is nothing like biting into a honey comb...

BTW thar, I liked the story of the shark! You are too funny! But truthfully I didn’t realize that they were that big...I’ve cooked mako shark, delish...I think I’d delve into hákari, but definitely not the ‘mug with ears’....hahaha

Ash,
Thanks for the pict...I love it! Dancing

hedy mmm


Islami
Posted: Monday, February 3, 2020 11:41:33 PM
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Green cardamom↴



Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, February 4, 2020 7:28:15 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
In Finland definitely Karelian hot pot and Karelian pasties.
Lotje1000
Posted: Tuesday, February 4, 2020 8:25:48 AM

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Location: Leuven, Flanders, Belgium
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
In Finland definitely Karelian hot pot and Karelian pasties.


Are they made of genuine Karelian Bear dog? ;)
hedy mmm
Posted: Tuesday, February 4, 2020 11:10:19 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
In Finland definitely Karelian hot pot and Karelian pasties.

Lotje1000 wrote:
Are they made of genuine Karelian Bear dog? ;)

hedy writes:
Thanks a bunch Islami for the pict! Applause They resemble pea or fava beans,
I’m going to check it out...thank you, Ashwin Joshi...see what you started? Applause

Also find out what Karelian hotpot, pasties, are, and...
Karelian bear dogs, maybe Lotje1000 is on to something...Think (just kidding! Your post made me laugh & laughing is good for the soul!)

I can tell you guys that “pasties” have a whole different meaning in my neck of the woods...
BUT you won’t see me threading it in my ‘Did You Know’ series... LOL

BTW Hi Jyrkkä Jätka Dancing, I trust all is well...I’m not too often on the forum...busy with work.d'oh!

hedy mmm Dancing

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, February 5, 2020 8:36:57 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
And, of course, lohisoppa, Salmon soup.
Romany
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2020 4:52:27 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

JJ - but I thought your National Dish was Beer, matured in the scent of pine needles from Finish saunas? You mean you've been having us on all these years?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2020 9:50:28 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Wow! Rice Pud in a shell!



We usually put meat, onions & taters in a pastie, but what the hell? Why not rice pudding?
But they're from Cornwall down in the far corner.
The trad meal for Lancashire, I suppose is Lancashire hotpot - with black pudding and parkin close behind.







Parkin is A-M-azing.
It's made with oats, not wheat flour and is coarse-ground (you can see the grainy bits in the mixture). Treakle (molasses), brown sugar, eggs, butter, lard and LOTS of ginger. Some people use golden syrup instead of treakle, but that's too sweet and sickly

Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Saturday, February 15, 2020 12:10:51 AM

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Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
Traditional Dish of my country↡







This lovely cup of tea is compatible with any dish. Like the English word 'the' does to the words, this dish also enlivens, raises taste buds, stimulates salivery glands and attaches meaning to the accompanying dishes.
whatson
Posted: Saturday, February 15, 2020 3:58:20 PM
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*
May I ask what the red items of decorations are made of?
Is the horizontal heart a paper cut-out? Do you have to
sip the tea fast (without paying attention to burns on your
lips and the length of the esophagus) lest it gets soggy
and sinks to the bottom? Are the ones depicted above the cup
just hovering there held in place by some magical force, or
is it a dish traditionally served in front of a wall and the
hearts fixed to it? If so, are those two hearts attached to
the wall before or after the cup is placed on the table?

hedy mmm
Posted: Saturday, February 15, 2020 10:09:30 PM

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Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Ashwin Joshi wrote:
This lovely cup of tea is compatible with any dish. Like the English word 'the' does to the words, this dish also enlivens, raises taste buds, stimulates salivery glands and attaches meaning to the accompanying dishes.

———
I love the description, Ashwin Joshi Applause however, I prefer ”A Cup of Joe” for my palate, that’s what we have in my neck of the woods...and like tea, it also enlivens, raises taste buds, stimulates salivery glands and attaches meaning to accompanying dishes.

Of course, there’s nothing like a cup of tea in the evening...I like Celestial Sasonings Herb Sleepytime Tea, its ingredients are Chamomile, Lemongrass, Spearmint, Tilia flowers, Blackberry leaves, Orange blossoms, Hawthorne and Rosebuds...from the fields and forests of the Rocky Mountains in the good old USA...you’d love it!Dancing

Thanks for the thread....Alyia111 and welcome to TFDDancing

hedy mmm




Islami
Posted: Sunday, February 16, 2020 11:08:31 AM
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Whatson wrote;

*
May I ask what the red items of decorations are made of?
Is the horizontal heart a paper cut-out? Do you have to
sip the tea fast (without paying attention to burns on your
lips and the length of the esophagus) lest it gets soggy
and sinks to the bottom? Are the ones depicted above the cup
just hovering there held in place by some magical force, or
is it a dish traditionally served in front of a wall and the
hearts fixed to it? If so, are those two hearts attached to
the wall before or after the cup is placed on the table?


It's a depiction of love for tea, O naive. I am sure you are not inocente, short-sighted or nescient. But at times you get spooked (pun intended).
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