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All slang is metaphor, and all metaphor is poetry. Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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All slang is metaphor, and all metaphor is poetry.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 12:16:25 AM

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Quotation of the Day
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All slang is metaphor, and all metaphor is poetry.
Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 2:58:27 AM
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Daemon wrote:
All slang is metaphor, and all metaphor is poetry.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)


I think that we can extend this metaphor a bit further - not all cursing is slang, but some are for sure. Yeah. Believe it or not, the cursing can trickle into the poetry too.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 5:26:28 AM

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“All slang is a metaphor, and all metaphor is poetry”

September 27, 2007, by liammorris


G.K. Chesterton said it well. Using slang gives us the ability to define our language, and in turn to define our culture. All my life I’ve been taught that proper speech and grammar are the only acceptable forms of communication. Even contractions were frowned upon in my papers. Grateful for the proper training in the art of grammar, but in search of new art; I now branch out into the world of the vernacular, slang, street talk, patois, fuzzwords, jargon, and lingo. Clear communication is key, and it is definitely an art. However, the method by which we express our inner thoughts and desires is developing. I’m here to celebrate slanguage, and its artistic creativity.

We will explore slang from around the country, poetry written in the vernacular, and go after whatever you might suggest. Contributions are not only welcome but necessary for survival. Let’s critique slang, and decide whether it lives or dies.

In the words of Raymond Chandler:
“I’ve found that there are only two kinds (slang) that are any good: slang that has established itself in the language, and slang that you make up yourself. Everything else is apt to be passé before it gets into print.”
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 5:29:22 AM

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slang




A type of language consisting of words and phrases that are regarded as very informal, are more common in speech than writing and are typically restricted to a particular context or group of people.
"Grass is slang for marijuana"

Synonyms :

informal language
colloquialisms
idioms
patois
argot
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 7:17:59 AM

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Context from:The Defendant by G.K. Chesterton



A DEFENCE OF SLANG

I do not imagine that it is necessary to demonstrate that this poetic allusiveness is the characteristic of true slang. Such an expression as 'Keep your hair on' is positively Meredithian in its perverse and mysterious manner of expressing an idea. The Americans have a well-known expression about 'swelled-head' as a description of self-approval, and the other day I heard a remarkable fantasia upon this air. An American said that after the Chinese War the Japanese wanted 'to put on their hats with a shoe-horn.' This is a monument of the true nature of slang, which consists in getting further and further away from the original conception, in treating it more and more as an assumption. It is rather like the literary doctrine of the Symbolists.

The real reason of this great development of eloquence among the lower orders again brings us back to the case of the aristocracy in earlier times. The lower classes live in a state of war, a war of words. Their readiness is the product of the same fiery individualism as the readiness of the old fighting oligarchs. Any cabman has to be ready with his tongue, as any gentleman of the last century had to be ready with his sword. It is unfortunate that the poetry which is developed by this process should be purely a grotesque poetry. But as the higher orders of society have entirely abdicated their right to speak with a heroic eloquence, it is no wonder that the language should develop by itself in the direction of a rowdy eloquence. The essential point is that somebody must be at work adding new symbols and new circumlocutions to a language.

All slang is metaphor, and all metaphor is poetry.
If we paused for a moment to examine the cheapest cant phrases that pass our lips every day, we should find that they were as rich and suggestive as so many sonnets. To take a single instance: we speak of a man in English social relations 'breaking the ice.' If this were expanded into a sonnet, we should have before us a dark and sublime picture of an ocean of everlasting ice, the sombre and baffling mirror of the Northern nature, over which men walked and danced and skated easily, but under which the living waters roared and toiled fathoms below. The world of slang is a kind of topsy-turveydom of poetry, full of blue moons and white elephants, of men losing their heads, and men whose tongues run away with them—a whole chaos of fairy tales.

Read more: http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks13/1301311h.html#ch15



don everly
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 8:20:44 PM

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Using slang around those who don't understand the jargon may result in a embarrassing moment, And that's no jive!
don everly
Posted: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 8:22:11 PM

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Joined: 11/14/2019
Posts: 17
Neurons: 1,873
Location: Owensboro, Kentucky, United States
don everly wrote:
Using slang around those who don't understand the jargon may result in a embarrassing moment, And that's no jive!
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