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When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there... Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene.

Jane Austen (1775-1817)
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 1:33:35 AM

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Quotation of the Day
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When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene.
Jane Austen (1775-1817)
KSPavan
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 1:33:36 AM

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Quotation of the Day
?
When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene.
Jane Austen (1775-1817)
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 1:39:25 AM
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Daemon wrote:
When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene.

Jane Austen (1775-1817)


Yeah, of course. For sure. Good night, my dear...
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 5:16:46 AM

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Though Jane Austen fans could spend forever debating their favorite novel (mine is the classic Pride and Prejudice, though Persuasion gives it a run for its money), you don’t often hear Janeites pick Mansfield Park as their number one choice. While Janeites prize certain novels for the romantic lines, or others for sharp wit and hilarious depictions of characters, it seems that Mansfield Park always gets overlooked. But, I'm here to tell you that some of Jane Austen's best quotes come from Mansfield Park.

By JULIA SEALES
Donny E
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 6:23:55 AM
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I wholeheartedly agree. What a wonderful wordsmith she was.
monamagda
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 10:34:36 AM

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Context from:Mansfield Park
11. CHAPTER XI

Fanny turned farther into the window; and Miss Crawford had only time to say, in a pleasant manner, "I fancy Miss Price has been more used to deserve praise than to hear it"; when, being earnestly invited by the Miss Bertrams to join in a glee, she tripped off to the instrument, leaving Edmund looking after her in an ecstasy of admiration of all her many virtues, from her obliging manners down to her light and graceful tread.

"There goes good-humour, I am sure," said he presently. "There goes a temper which would never give pain! How well she walks! and how readily she falls in with the inclination of others! joining them the moment she is asked. What a pity," he added, after an instant's reflection, "that she should have been in such hands!"

Fanny agreed to it, and had the pleasure of seeing him continue at the window with her, in spite of the expected glee; and of having his eyes soon turned, like hers, towards the scene without, where all that was solemn, and soothing, and lovely, appeared in the brilliancy of an unclouded night, and the contrast of the deep shade of the woods. Fanny spoke her feelings. "Here's harmony!" said she; "here's repose! Here's what may leave all painting and all music behind, and what poetry only can attempt to describe! Here's what may tranquillise every care, and lift the heart to rapture! When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended to, and people were carried more out of themselves by contemplating such a scene."

"I like to hear your enthusiasm, Fanny. It is a lovely night, and they are much to be pitied who have not been taught to feel, in some degree, as you do; who have not, at least, been given a taste for Nature in early life. They lose a great deal."

"You taught me to think and feel on the subject, cousin."

"I had a very apt scholar. There's Arcturus looking very bright."

Read more: http://www.literaturepage.com/read/mansfieldpark-102.html


mudbudda669
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2019 2:01:25 PM

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