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Due to his mother’s pressure... Options
Amybal
Posted: Thursday, November 14, 2019 5:19:24 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/8/2018
Posts: 815
Neurons: 4,289
Hi, is there anything wrong in these sentences?

Short summary
Due to his mother’s pressure and ill treatment, Zaidi and his wife move to a village mansion belonging to his grandmother where they are haunted by strange dreams and eerie screams of babies.

Long summary
Zaidi is a teacher whose rich widow mother longs for grandchildren. She often pressurizes him to remarry as his wife Azlinda has yet to bear any children. Fed up, Zaidi asks for a transfer and his new workplace turns out to be the village his late father was born in. The couple moves into his grandmother's mansion which is taken care of by its gardener where they are haunted by strange dreams and eerie screams of babies.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Thursday, November 14, 2019 9:13:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 3,331
Neurons: 905,442
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
One note for you.

You pressure people to do something, or you put pressure on someone to do something, but you don't pressurize people.
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, November 14, 2019 11:48:28 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 12,179
Neurons: 60,532
Amybal wrote:
Hi, is there anything wrong in these sentences?
I suggest:

Short summary
Due to his mother’s pressure and ill treatment, Zaidi and his wife move to a village mansion belonging to his grandmother where they are haunted by strange dreams and the eerie screams of babies.

Long summary
Zaidi is a teacher whose rich, widowed mother longs for grandchildren. She often pressures him to remarry, as his wife, Azlinda, has yet to bear any children. Fed up, Zaidi asks for a transfer, and his new workplace turns out to be the village of his late father. The couple moves into his grandmother's mansion, which is cared for by its gardener, but they are haunted by strange dreams and the eerie screams of babies.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, November 14, 2019 11:51:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 12,179
Neurons: 60,532
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
One note for you.

You pressure people to do something, or you put pressure on someone to do something, but you don't pressurize people.


You can if they have "the bends". Sorry, couldn't resist. The mental picture was too funny to pass up...Whistle

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
srirr
Posted: Thursday, November 14, 2019 11:18:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009
Posts: 8,146
Neurons: 443,924
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
One note for you.

You pressure people to do something, or you put pressure on someone to do something, but you don't pressurize people.


Well, this seems to be another BE vs AE issue. I have often used pressurize in relation to people. When I read your comment, I was a bit perplexed. Then I checked a few online dictionaries and noticed that it is correct in BE to use pressurize which means to strongly persuade someone to do something.

Cambridge Dictionary
UK
(US pressure)
to strongly persuade someone to do something they do not want to do:
He was pressurized into signing the agreement.

Collins Dictionary
REGIONAL NOTE:
in BRIT, also use pressurise
1. VERB
If you are pressurized into doing something, you are forcefully persuaded to do it.
Do not be pressurized into making your decision immediately. [be VERB-ed + into]
He thought she was trying to pressurize him. [VERB noun]
Synonyms: force, drive, compel, intimidate


Macmillan Dictionary
BRITISH to try to persuade or force someone to do something. The usual American word is pressure
Now it’s up to them to pressurize manufacturers.


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
FounDit
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 11:14:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 12,179
Neurons: 60,532
srirr wrote:
Wilmar (USA) wrote:
One note for you.

You pressure people to do something, or you put pressure on someone to do something, but you don't pressurize people.


Well, this seems to be another BE vs AE issue. I have often used pressurize in relation to people. When I read your comment, I was a bit perplexed. Then I checked a few online dictionaries and noticed that it is correct in BE to use pressurize which means to strongly persuade someone to do something.

Cambridge Dictionary
UK
(US pressure)
to strongly persuade someone to do something they do not want to do:
He was pressurized into signing the agreement.

Collins Dictionary
REGIONAL NOTE:
in BRIT, also use pressurise
1. VERB
If you are pressurized into doing something, you are forcefully persuaded to do it.
Do not be pressurized into making your decision immediately. [be VERB-ed + into]
He thought she was trying to pressurize him. [VERB noun]
Synonyms: force, drive, compel, intimidate


Macmillan Dictionary
BRITISH to try to persuade or force someone to do something. The usual American word is pressure
Now it’s up to them to pressurize manufacturers.

That is interesting. I had no idea we use the terms differently. It's good to know, because had I seen it used by someone, I would have thought it an error. Thanks.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
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