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The Scilly Naval Disaster (1707) Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, October 22, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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The Scilly Naval Disaster (1707)

Celebrated English Admiral Cloudesley Shovell was returning from an abortive attack on Toulon, France, in 1707 when his ship and several others struck rocks off the Scilly Islands, southwest of England. In one of the greatest maritime disasters in British history, Shovell is believed to have drowned along with as many as 2,000 sailors. According to one of the many legends about the disaster, Shovell reached the shore alive, only to be murdered by a woman who stole what priceless object from him? More...
WeaselADAPT
Posted: Tuesday, October 22, 2019 1:16:06 AM

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According to one of the many legends about the disaster, Shovell reached the shore alive, only to be murdered by a woman who stole what priceless object from him?

A certain priceless emerald ring.

the Weasel
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, October 22, 2019 2:10:13 AM

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This Day in History
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The Scilly Naval Disaster (1707)
Celebrated English Admiral Cloudesley Shovell was returning from an abortive attack on Toulon, France, in 1707 when his ship and several others struck rocks off the Scilly Islands, southwest of England. In one of the greatest maritime disasters in British history, Shovell is believed to have drowned along with as many as 2,000 sailors. According to one of the many legends about the disaster, Shovell reached the shore alive, only to be murdered by a woman who stole what priceless object from him
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Tuesday, October 22, 2019 5:19:51 AM

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The 1707 Isles of Scilly Disaster

22 October 2014

The anniversaries of several important naval events take place in late October. Today, 22 October, is the anniversary of one of the British Navy’s greatest tragedies – the Isles of Scilly shipwreck of 1707, in which four ships and over 1300 men were lost.

For the longitude story, and in particular, the passing of the 1714 Longitude Act, the Isles of Scilly disaster has taken on particular importance in the last 50 years or so. Indeed, the catalog of 4 Steps to Longitude, an exhibition at the National Maritime Museum in 1962, stated that the disaster ‘stirred public opinion; it was quoted as an illustration of the urgent need of a means to find longitude at sea, and contributed to the passing of the Act of 1714’. Other authors have followed suit in the decades since, often with more florid prose.

What I’m going to do over two posts is to look a little more closely at the connection between the 1707 disaster on the Isles of Scilly and the Longitude Act and think about two questions:
In this post - to what extent did the lack of a means of fixing longitude contribute to the disaster?
And in a second post - how significant was the tragedy in precipitating the 1714 Act?

So let's start with the shipwreck. By 1707, Sir Cloudesley Shovell had a long and illustrious service career in the Royal Navy. He was Admiral of the Fleet and in command of operations in the Mediterranean, so he had made the autumn journey back to England a number of times. Indeed, as early as May 1673, aged 23, he had been part of a fleet under Sir John Narborough that almost came to grief on the Isles of Scilly.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Tuesday, October 22, 2019 12:39:53 PM

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The Scilly Naval Disaster (1707)
Celebrated English Admiral Cloudesley Shovell was returning from an abortive attack on Toulon, France, in 1707 when his ship and several others struck rocks off the Scilly Islands, southwest of England. In one of the greatest maritime disasters in British history, Shovell is believed to have drowned along with as many as 2,000 sailors. According to one of the many legends about the disaster, Shovell reached the shore alive, only to be murdered by a woman who stole what priceless object from him
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