The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Neopaganism Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 28,739
Neurons: 85,395
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Neopaganism

Neopaganism is an umbrella term for a variety of modern religious movements, particularly those inspired by the pre-Christian traditions of the Egyptians, Greeks, Norse, and Celts. Neopagans fall into two broad categories, nature-oriented and magical groups, and often engage in arcane and elaborate rituals. Two of the movement's most influential thinkers were Alphonse L. Constant and Gerard Encausse, who helped popularize the movement in the 19th century. What is the largest Neopagan religion? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 1:36:25 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 7,585
Neurons: 3,507,346
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Article of the Day
?

Neopaganism
Neopaganism is an umbrella term for a variety of modern religious movements, particularly those inspired by the pre-Christian traditions of the Egyptians, Greeks, Norse, and Celts. Neopagans fall into two broad categories, nature-oriented and magical groups, and often engage in arcane and elaborate rituals. Two of the movement's most influential thinkers were Alphonse L. Constant and Gerard Encausse, who helped popularize the movement in the 19th century.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 4:44:46 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/1/2017
Posts: 2,552
Neurons: 450,729
Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
Neo-Paganism

WRITTEN BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica


Neo-Paganism, any of several spiritual movements that attempt to revive the ancient polytheistic religions of Europe and the Middle East. These movements have a close relationship with ritual magic and modern witchcraft. Neo-Paganism differs from them, however, in striving to revive authentic pantheons and rituals of ancient cultures, though often in deliberately eclectic and reconstructionist ways, and by a particularly contemplative and celebratory attitude. Typically people with romantic feelings toward nature and deep ecological concerns, Neo-Pagans center their dramatic and colorful rituals around the changes of the seasons and the personification of nature as full of divine life, as well as the holy days and motifs of the religions by which their own groups are inspired.

Modern Neo-Paganism has roots in 19th-century Romanticism and activities inspired by it, such as the British Order of Druids (which, however, claims an older lineage). Sometimes associated with extreme nationalism, Neo-Pagan groups and sentiments were known in Europe before World War II, but contemporary Neo-Paganism is, for the most part, a product of the 1960s. Influenced by the works of the psychiatrist Carl Jung and the writer Robert Graves, Neo-Paganists are more interested in nature and archetypal psychology than in nationalism.

Neo-Paganism in the postwar decades has flourished particularly in the United States and the United Kingdom and in Scandinavia. Some of the major Neo-Pagan groups are the Church of All Worlds, the largest of all the pagan movements, which centres on worship of the earth-mother goddess; Feraferia, based on ancient Greek religion and also centred on goddess worship; Pagan Way, a nature religion centred on goddess worship and the seasons; the Reformed Druids of North America; the Church of the Eternal Source, which has revived ancient Egyptian religion; and the Viking Brotherhood, which celebrates Norse rites. Beginning in the late 1970s, some feminists, open to feminine personifications of the deity, became interested in witchcraft and Neo-Paganism.

This article was most recently revised and updated by Matt Stefon, Assistant Editor.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 12:16:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 3,036
Neurons: 837,034
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
Neopaganism is an umbrella term for a variety of modern religious movements, particularly those inspired by the pre-Christian traditions of the Egyptians, Greeks, Norse, and Celts. Neopagans fall into two broad categories, nature-oriented and magical groups, and often engage in arcane and elaborate rituals. Two of the movement's most influential thinkers were Alphonse L. Constant and Gerard Encausse, who helped popularize the movement in the 19th century.

Very sad.
thar
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 2:54:58 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 20,433
Neurons: 82,567
In Iceland it is reassertion of culture and roots. Not 'The Church of...." telling you what to believe - just celebrating being human.



Quote:
The religion of the original Viking settlers of Iceland, the old Norse paganism Ásatrú, is not just still alive and well in Iceland, it is undergoing something of a renaissance. Here is our quick guide to the current state of Ásatrú, the ancient religion of the Vikings, in Iceland.



Quote:
Ásatrúarfélagið is the sixth largest religion in Iceland, and the largest non-Christian religion.



Quote:
4. No proselytizing or missionary work


This growth has come in spite of the fact that unlike other religious organizations Ásatrúarfélagið has never engaged in any form of missionary work or proselytizing.

Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson, the high priest of Ásatrúarfélagið, has said that he believes the reason for the growing interest in Ásatrú is caused by more and more people are learning about what the association does and seeing their ceremonies.

5. One high priest, 10 Goðar
The organization of Ásatrúarfélagið is based on the historic organization of Ásatrú during the Viking age. Priests in Ásatrú are called Goði, with each Goði responsible for a congregation "goðorð". While the goðorð were associated with certain geographic areas during the Viking age, people were free to choose their Goði.

Ásatrúarfélagið observes four main blót each year, as well as a Þorrablót.
The highest office in Ásatrú is the Allsherjargoði, "The Goði of All". The second highest office is Kjalnesingagoði "The Goði of Kjalarnesþing", which comprised the areas controlled by the descendants of Ingólfur Arnarson, the first settler of Iceland. This area corresponds to the greater Metropolitan Area.

Nine other Goðar (the plural for Goði) serve different geographic regions. The Goðar can perform all religious services, including naming ceremonies, marriages, funerals and blót.

6. All the ceremonies of Ásatrúarfélagið are open to the general public

The weekly meetings of Ásatrúarfélagið are open to the public, as are all its official ceremonies, the blót.

Ásatrúarfélagið has four main blót each year: Jólablót (Yule-blót) at winter solstice in honor of the goddess Freyja, Sigurblót (Victory-blót) held on Sumardagurinn Fyrsti in the spring in honor of the god Freyr, Þingblót (Þing/assembly-blót) on Summer solstice held in honor of the laws, the Þing and human society, and Veturnáttablót (Winter-nights-blót) held on the first day of winter. Veturnáttablót is in honor of Óðinn, the god of the gods.


Ásatrúarfélagið has other blót, including a Þorrablót in mid-winter.

Ásatrúarfélagið has an open house in Reykjavík at Síðumúli 15 every Saturday 14:00-16:00.

7. First pagan temple since 1000 will be opened in 2018

THE TEMPLE The temple will have seating for 250 people.

Next year Ásatrúarfélagið will move into a new temple just outside downtown Reykjavík. The temple would be the first heathen central temple built in the Nordic countries for more than a thousand years.

Ásatrúarfélagið has been working on the new temple in the southern slope of Öskjuhlíðin hill just outside downtown Reykjavík for two years. In March 2015 a ceremony was held to consecrate the ground where the temple will rise, and last year a ceremony was held to thank Mother Nature for the timber for the temple.

The temple will be 400 square meter (4,300 sq ft) dome which will be able to accommodate 250 people. The temple is expected to be opened to the public in March 2018.

8. There is no prescribed dogma or scripture

Ásatrú has no prescribed dogma or scripture. However, You are however encouraged to read the Poetic and Prose Eddas written by the 13th-century chieftain and scholar, Snorri Sturluson.

No one actually prays to the gods and how you might ask their intercession is entirely up to you. The gods are imperfect and not divine. They are seen more as friends and don´t judge us humans.

9, It is a religion of peace and tolerance

Ásatrú, as it has been practiced in Iceland, is a religion of nature and life, stressing the harmony of the natural world and the search for harmony in the life of individuals. It's openness and philosophical character has led some to compare it to Unitarian Universalism.


Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson, the high priest of Ásatrúarfélagið, has stressed that Ásatrú is a religion of peace and respect. “It is a religion which teaches you how to live in harmony with your surroundings and yourself, and how to deal with the different phases of your life. How to become of age and then how to age.” True to this Ásatrú is a religion of respect and tolerance. “We reflect Icelandic society and Icelandic values,”

As a natural religion the Ásatrú stresses the interconnection of all things and especially a respect for nature. Members are environmentally aware and know that for Mother Earth to be be bountiful she must be cared for and nurtured. The association has taken a firm stand on conservation and environmentalism.

10. It rejects militarism and the glorification of heroism, battles and blood.

Many neo-pagan groups in Europe and the US who consider themselves observers of the religion of the Vikings, practice a religion which glorifies battles, militarism, masculine heroism and in some cases chauvinism, violence, intolerance and racism. Some white-power groups and members of Aryan Nation gangs practice these forms of paganism.

Ásatrúarfélagið rejects this as a misreading of Ásatrú.



It is funny - and sad, pathetic even, that Icelandic pagans get hate mail for being too nice from 'viking-stylised' groups in other countries.

Quote:


11. Ásatrúarfélagið has received hate mail from reactionary heathens abroad

Ásatrúarfélagið has cut all ties with foreign associations of pagans after receiving harassment and hate mail from people who are angry with emphasis the association has placed upon equality and respect for human rights, especially LGBTQ rights.


IN 1991 Sveinbjörn cut all ties to foreign pagans in reaction to what Icelandic pagans felt was the reactionary and hateful practice of the faith by many foreign pagans.

Every year the priests of Ásatrúarfélagið have officiate dozens of same-sex marriages. Same sex couples come to Iceland with the sole purpose of being married in a Ásatrú ceremony.

Anyone can practice the religion
But only Icelandic residents can join Ásatrúarfélagið

Only Icelandic citizens or people who have a domicile in Iceland can become members of the Ásatrúarfélag, but anyone can practice Ásatrú, regardless of their nationality or residence. It costs nothing to join and is open to all, irrespective of race, cultural background, gender or sexual orientation.




POLITICS
Rainbow flags all around Reykjavík during Pence visit

Photos: Reykjavík fire department rescues cat from tree
GEOLOGY
Öræfajökull: Iceland's second deadliest volcano

POPULAR VIDEOS
Watch: Wonderful drone video of haymaking in North Iceland
Come prepared! Video reminds us travelling in the highlands is never a walk in the park!
Spectacular NASA satellite photo of the Holuhraun eruption





Source https://icelandmag.is/article/11-things-know-about-present-day-practice-asatru-ancient-religion-vikings


Quote:
Old Norse Weddings Becoming More Popular For Same-Sex Couples



Iceland is not just a popular spot for same-sex weddings; an increasing number of couples are opting to get married as per Old Norse tradition.

Gay Iceland reports that the full legalisation of same-sex marriage in Iceland in 2010 has prompted many couples to choose the country as a destination to tie the knot. Increasingly, many of those couples are opting to skip having a church wedding and go full Old Norse, joining together in sacred matrimony in a ceremony conducted by Ásatrúarfélagið.

“There has been a massive increase in demand for same-sex wedding ceremonies in the last year, an explosion really,” Hilmar Örn Hilmarsson, high chieftain of Ásatrúarfélagið, told Gay Iceland. “The pagan belief is very inclusive and we are open to all opinions. So we welcome all, gay or straight, Icelandic or foreign.”

In fact, Ásatrúarfélagið has been conducting same-sex marriages since 2003, outpacing the National Church by seven years. However, they had no legal grounds on which to base the weddings – couples were requires to go to the county office (sýslumaðurinn) in order to make their marriage official. In 2013, Ásatrúarfélagið was finally granted the authority to make their weddings legally binding in themselves.

Those interested in having their wedding in Iceland can get the information they need from the Icelandic Ethical Humanist Association, Ásatrúarfélagið or Pink Iceland.




Source https://grapevine.is/news/2015/05/15/old-norse-weddings-becoming-more-popular-for-same-sex-couples/




WeaselADAPT
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 9:18:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/6/2014
Posts: 187
Neurons: 16,740
Location: Kentwood, Michigan, United States
I love the symbols!

the Weasel
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.