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her snide remarks Options
Reiko07
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 12:12:10 AM

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(1) Her snide remarks at the party were a faux pas.

(2) Her telling snide remarks at the party was a faux pas.

Which is correct?
thar
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 12:41:16 AM

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You don't 'tell remarks' so that is wrong.



Also, the combination of vocabulary doesn't work.

1 would be OK if some of the vobabulary were changed.

'snide' means nasty, mean. It is a deliberate attempt to embarrasss or hurt someone.

A faux pas (literally a 'wrong step') is a mistake, saying something embarassing unintentionally.


Quote:
an embarrassing or tactless act or remark in a social situation.
"‘I was suddenly sick in the back of their car’—it was years before he could confess his faux pas to them"
synonyms: gaffe, blunder, mistake;



You are not snide by mistake - it is a deliberate choice to say something insulting.

Quote:
snide
adjective
1.
derogatory or mocking in an indirect way.
"snide remarks about my mother"
synonyms: disparaging, derogatory, deprecating, deprecatory, denigratory, insulting, vituperative, disapproving, contemptuous;

Reiko07
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 1:00:57 AM

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Thank you very much, thar.

Sorry, the use of "telling" is my careless mistake.

As for "snide", I should have been more careful with logic. d'oh!

What about the following?

(3) Her tactless remarks at the party were a faux pas.

(4) Her making tactless remarks at the party was a faux pas.

(5) Her giving tactless remarks at the party was a faux pas.
sureshot
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 1:25:04 AM
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Reiko07 wrote:
Thank you very much, thar.

Sorry, the use of "telling" is my careless mistake.

As for "snide", I should have been more careful with logic. d'oh!

What about the following?

(3) Her tactless remarks at the party were a faux pas.

(4) Her making tactless remarks at the party was a faux pas.

(5) Her giving tactless remarks at the party was a faux pas.


____________________

Say:

(3) Her tactless remarks at the party were a faux pas.
Reiko07
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 2:54:15 AM

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Thank you very much, sureshot.
thar
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:04:06 AM

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3 and 4 are fine.

You make remarks, but you don't 'give' remarks.


So there are two ways of expressing it that are both natural.

1 her remarks
- the result
(obviously, if they were her remarks then she made them, so that is implicit)

2 her making .... remarks
- the action
she made tactless remarks, and that was a faux pas.


note the function of 'her' is different in each case - in 1 it is a simple possessive, in 2 it is the subject of the verb participle.
Reiko07
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 5:44:52 AM

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thar wrote:

You make remarks, but you don't 'give' remarks.


Thank you very much, thar. I thought "give" was OK in American English.

verb + remark
deliver (esp. AmE), give (esp. AmE), make, offer (esp. AmE), pass, utter
The Pope delivered his ~s before boarding his plane.
I gave my ~s at the benefit.
(Oxford Collocation Dictionary)
thar
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 10:09:36 AM

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The Papal one is fine - that is 'to deliver a speech' and they are calling that 'remarks' but it is a rare usage of remarks and only works in a very formal setting for BrE, like the Pope giving a speech, where every word is analysed and taken seriously!

The second one - I don't know, it sounds odd to me but maybe in AmE it is how you say it.
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 11:46:57 AM

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thar wrote:
The Papal one is fine - that is 'to deliver a speech' and they are calling that 'remarks' but it is a rare usage of remarks and only works in a very formal setting for BrE, like the Pope giving a speech, where every word is analysed and taken seriously!

The second one - I don't know, it sounds odd to me but maybe in AmE it is how you say it.


Yes, "delivered" and "gave" are both used commonly in AmE.
Reiko07
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 9:39:55 PM

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Joined: 10/30/2018
Posts: 840
Neurons: 4,215
Thank you very much, thar and FounDit.
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