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me or I ? Options
Mba Learning
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 5:43:25 AM

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Which is correct?Do you wish you were me ? or Do you wish you were I? please?










i
Blodybeef
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 6:26:43 AM

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If we try to rephrase this sentence it would become :

Do you wish you were the person who I am?

Therefore it seems "Do you wish you were I?" to be closer to correct.

Speak to the hand

However, in my experience, I've come accross with "Do you wish you were me?" more often.

Think

“Integrity is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching." ― C.S. Lewis
srirr
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 7:22:35 AM

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I second Blodybeef. The correct and standard English goes for "Do you wish you were I?". It demands for a subjective pronoun. However, in conversations, the commonly heard phrase is "...you were me".

It's something like "It is I" vs "It is me" issue.

We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Audiendus
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 8:32:24 AM
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srirr wrote:
I second Blodybeef. The correct and standard English goes for "Do you wish you were I?". It demands for a subjective pronoun. However, in conversations, the commonly heard phrase is "...you were me".

It's something like "It is I" vs "It is me" issue.

"Do you wish you were I?", though grammatically regular, sounds very unnatural, so in my opinion it can hardly be called correct. The plain "Do you wish" does not fit with the very formal "I". Students should be taught to say (and normally also write) "me" here if they wish to sound natural.

Compare "Do you wish you had become I?", which is also grammatically regular, but sounds even worse! ("Become" is a linking verb, so would take a subjective pronoun according to the grammatical 'rule'.)
thar
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 8:35:03 AM

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People always have confusion over I vs me but it never seems to come up in the third person.

eg
I wish I were he.
That just sounds wrong.



I think this is another one of those examples where for a short period of couple of hundred years, grammarians tried to make English obey Latin rules.

In Latin the verb 'to be' takes a nominative in the complement.


But English people don't speak Latin, much to the frustration of Victorian grammar teachers and their teaching legacy.


They say 'It's me'.
I am not saying 'everyone says that' - some people (presumably those who were either taught it themselves, or whose parents and influences used it, and they grew up copying it) say 'It is I'. But they are a minority, I think. And more importantly, they are not some educated minority who have it right while the rest of the oiks say it incorrectly. That is not how it works!

(Except maybe in 'Indian English' which tends to be far more conservative with some of its grammar, and is a taught and passed-down language in a different way.)


so, commonly, people say
I wish I were him.
and
I wish you were me.


Just like they say 'they', split infinitives, put prepositions at the end of a sentence and, at least in BrE, often consider 'a couple' to be two people.


Spoiler alert - The Roman Empire ended and the Barbarians won. Whistle


Whistle

Blodybeef
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 9:01:36 AM

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Long live the barbarians




“Integrity is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching." ― C.S. Lewis
Audiendus
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 9:03:34 AM
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Interestingly, even the Romans used the accusative case in "Me miserum!" ("Poor me!", "Unhappy me!").
sapper-ed
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 12:07:26 PM

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me
BobShilling
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 1:34:35 PM
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Audiendus wrote:
Interestingly, even the Romans used the accusative case in "Me miserum!" ("Poor me!", "Unhappy me!").


Accusative in Exclamations.

183. The Accusative, generally modified by an Adjective, is used in Exclamations; as,—

mē miserum, ah, wretched me!

Ō fallācem spem, oh, deceptive hope!

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15665/15665-h/15665-h.htm#sect172

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