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get stuffed! Options
onsen
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:09:17 AM
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Hello,

Quote:

stuffed (stʌft)
adj
1. (Cookery) filled with something, esp (of poultry and other food) filled with stuffing
2. (Physiology) (foll by up) (of the nasal passages) blocked with mucus
3. get stuffed! slang Brit an exclamation of contemptuous anger or annoyance, esp against another person
TFD


How does one reach 3. starting from 1. and 2. in meaning?
Or do 1. and 2. have nothing to do with 3.?


Thank you.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 4:31:07 AM

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onsen wrote:
Hello,

Quote:

stuffed (stʌft)
adj
1. (Cookery) filled with something, esp (of poultry and other food) filled with stuffing
2. (Physiology) (foll by up) (of the nasal passages) blocked with mucus
3. get stuffed! slang Brit an exclamation of contemptuous anger or annoyance, esp against another person
TFD


How does one reach 3. starting from 1. and 2. in meaning?
Or do 1. and 2. have nothing to do with 3.?


Thank you.


I have always thought of the stuffed in "get stuffed" as a polite way of refering to the act of sexual intercourse, "get stuffed" is an equivalent of "f**k off".
You can argue that it is a reference to one thing being filled with another I guess.

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onsen
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 9:23:07 AM
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Sarrriesfan wrote:

I have always thought of the stuffed in "get stuffed" as a polite way of refering to the act of sexual intercourse, "get stuffed" is an equivalent of "f**k off".
You can argue that it is a reference to one thing being filled with another I guess.


Thank you very much, Sarrriesfan, for your reply.

How is <"get stuffed" is an equivalent of "f**k off".> related to 'an exclamation of contemptuous anger or annoyance, esp against another person'?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 12:47:18 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
onsen wrote:
Sarrriesfan wrote:

I have always thought of the stuffed in "get stuffed" as a polite way of refering to the act of sexual intercourse, "get stuffed" is an equivalent of "f**k off".
You can argue that it is a reference to one thing being filled with another I guess.


Thank you very much, Sarrriesfan, for your reply.

How is <"get stuffed" is an equivalent of "f**k off".> related to 'an exclamation of contemptuous anger or annoyance, esp against another person'?


Because f**k off is an exclamation of contemptuous anger or annoyance, esp against another person.

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/fuck-off

Quote:
exclamation
1.
a forceful expression of dismissal or contempt


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Romany
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 6:15:47 AM
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I think that there is a great deal of satisfaction in telling someone to "Go and get.....!" so there are lots of alternatives to using that which are perfectly innocuous:

"Get stuffed" "Get knotted" "Get a life" "Get creamed" - my father even used "Get pixilated!". In fact, once the "Get..." has slipped out people substitute all sorts of things, even a sheepish "GET...away." The point is that the minute someone has snapped out "GET..." the hearer knows they are angry/genuinely upset. What you say after it doesn't really matter: you are really peed off and the hearer now knows it.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 8:45:55 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:

I think that there is a great deal of satisfaction in telling someone to "Go and get.....!" so there are lots of alternatives to using that which are perfectly innocuous:

"Get stuffed" "Get knotted" "Get a life" "Get creamed" - my father even used "Get pixilated!". In fact, once the "Get..." has slipped out people substitute all sorts of things, even a sheepish "GET...away." The point is that the minute someone has snapped out "GET..." the hearer knows they are angry/genuinely upset. What you say after it doesn't really matter: you are really peed off and the hearer now knows it.


I would agree, but how much of the the time is the use of an innocuous term just a substitute for what a person really wants to say, sometimes we train ourselves to use other terms than the one we would really like to use. It become natural for us to use it when push comes to shove we really mean the strongest term.

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FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 11:32:40 AM

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This puts me in mind of the TV show Happy Days, where the idiom "Sit on it!" was popularized. It has always seemed to me to have been a shortened version of "Sit on it, and spin!", which was popular when I was a teen.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 4:36:45 PM
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Sarries -

Oh undoubtedly - that's what all euphemisms do.

You'll note that I said that's what some people do.

I didn't mention either whether other people find that hypocritical.

And I cannily gave no clue as to which camp I fall into: the euphemists or the let-it-rip camp?

Dancing Dancing Dancing
onsen
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 1:00:05 AM
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Thank you very much for the discussion so far.


The dictionary gives the following sentence with the phrase 'get stuffed' in it.

Quote:
The headmaster can go and get stuffed.
(Harrap’s Standard Learners’ English Dictionary)


Each phrase is clear. But, the whole sentence isn’t clear. What does it mean?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 4:20:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
onsen wrote:
Thank you very much for the discussion so far.


The dictionary gives the following sentence with the phrase 'get stuffed' in it.

Quote:
The headmaster can go and get stuffed.
(Harrap’s Standard Learners’ English Dictionary)


Each phrase is clear. But, the whole sentence isn’t clear. What does it mean?


It may be a statement said from the point of view of a disgruntled pupil, “The headmaster can go and get stuffed” because he has made ruling against that pupil they dislike detention, a caning, etc.
It could also be a teacher that disapproves of an employment related matter, being asked to take on extra work for example.
For example:
Teacher A speaking with Teacher B:
Teacher A “The headmaster wants me to referee the 4th years football match on Saturday”.
Teacher B “Don’t you have tickets to the theatre on Saturday what are you going to do?”
Teacher A “The headmaster can go and get stuffed”.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 5:11:21 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:
Sarries -

Oh undoubtedly - that's what all euphemisms do.

You'll note that I said that's what some people do.

I didn't mention either whether other people find that hypocritical.

And I cannily gave no clue as to which camp I fall into: the euphemists or the let-it-rip camp?

Dancing Dancing Dancing



Romany I think I can guess.Whistle Whistle

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
RSoul
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 7:28:50 AM

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FounDit wrote:
This puts me in mind of the TV show Happy Days, where the idiom "Sit on it!" was popularized. It has always seemed to me to have been a shortened version of "Sit on it, and spin!", which was popular when I was a teen.


Yeah, the show itself sat on it and spun so much it finally jumped the shark.

Ubuntu isn't Swahili for 'can't install Debian'.
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