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'secretary of U.S state' Vs 'U.S secretary of state' [word order] Options
A cooperator
Posted: Monday, September 9, 2019 6:39:18 AM

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Hi Everyone!
I've seen these phrases on the topic of when to capitalize job titles somewhere on the Internet:
"U.S Secretary of State Colin Powell" and "Saad Sherida Al-Kaabi, Qatar Minister of State for Energy Affairs, announces that Qatar will leave OPEC next month during..."
But, as long as State is for the U.S, and for Qatar, I am wondering why the author didn't phrase them as follows:
Secretary of U.S State Colin Powell, where the descriptive words 'U.S' are first listed like the way "As per Government of India Guidelines" is phrased.

Saad Sherida Al-Kaabi, Minister of Qatar State for Energy Affairs.



I was told
Quote:
Secretary of State is the title of the post. You can't break it up. Colin Powell was the US Secretary of State.

Dominic Raab, whose official job title is Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs) is normally referred to as the (UK) Foreign Secretary.


Also,
Quote:
"State" has many definitions. In this case, "State" does NOT mean one of the American geographically distinct States. It has the broader meaning of "the operations or concerns of the government of a country" (from Merriam Webster).

Also, "Secretary of State" is defined by the same source as "the head of the U.S. government department that is in charge of how the country relates to and deals with foreign countries."




Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Monday, September 9, 2019 7:51:47 AM

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No.
As explained before, this is a job title.

Secretary of State
Minister of State for Energy Affairs




You will find it in many examples, and it is always that way.


UK
Quote:

Chris Heaton-Harris was appointed as a Minister of State at the Department for Transport on 25 July


You can have a 'Minister' and a 'Minister of State' - those are different job titles.
Audiendus
Posted: Monday, September 9, 2019 9:34:10 AM
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A cooperator wrote:
But, as long as State is for the U.S, and for Qatar, I am wondering why the author didn't phrase them as follows:
Secretary of U.S State Colin Powell, where the descriptive words 'U.S' are first listed like the way "As per Government of India Guidelines" is phrased.


The two constructions are not parallel. One refers to the "Government of India", i.e. the Indian Government (not the "Government of Guidelines", which would not make sense); the other refers to the "Secretary of State" (not the "Secretary of U.S", which would not make sense).

You need to consider the meanings of phrases. You will then see that a construction that is appropriate in one case may not be appropriate in another.
palapaguy
Posted: Monday, September 9, 2019 12:37:48 PM

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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
I and others have explained this several times. "United States Secretary of State" is the title of a post. You can't change the word order.

There is no "Secretary of U.S State." It does not exist.

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