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A tab-line? Options
QP
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 10:37:37 AM
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Joined: 5/28/2015
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Hi friends,

I read an English novel and found this word which I don't understand:-

"Why your name is Tab?"

"It is an office nickname. The boys say that I've a passion for making my exit on a good line...really, I believe it is the line on which the curtain falls...you'll understand that, it is one of the conventions of the drama"

"A tab-line?"

Could you please help to explain the word in bold.

Thank you
QP
thar
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 10:53:04 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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As in the explanation the character gives!
The line delivered as the curtains close.

A tab is a curtain that draws across the front of the stage - the horizontal curtains that close at the end of the performance.
(And open at the beginning, to show the tableau -> tab)

Quote:
The front curtain, which is variously called a grand drape, act curtain, house curtain, house drape, main drape, main rag, or, in the UK, tabs, hangs downstage, just behind the proscenium arch. It is typically opened and closed during performances to reveal or conceal the stage and scenery from the audience.




https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theater_drapes_and_stage_curtains

The tab line is, as the speaker explains, " it is the line on which the curtain falls"
Ie a character says that line, presumably something dramatic, profound, funny or intriguing; that is the end of the act or show, and the curtains close.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 10:58:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 12,189
Neurons: 60,560
QP wrote:
Hi friends,

I read an English novel and found this word which I don't understand:-

"Why your name is Tab?"

"It is an office nickname. The boys say that I've a passion for making my exit on a good line...really, I believe it is the line on which the curtain falls...you'll understand that, it is one of the conventions of the drama"

"A tab-line?"

Could you please help to explain the word in bold.

Thank you
QP


I've never heard of "Tab" used in this way as a curtain fall. The only use I've ever heard as a name was the actor "Tab Hunter" from the 1950's. Like most actors, this was not his real name, but was simply made up by someone else.

Edit: thar posted while I was writing. It makes sense now why I am not familiar with it, if it is primarily a British term and usage. I learned something new today. Always a good thing...Applause


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
QP
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 11:00:59 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/28/2015
Posts: 516
Neurons: 9,603
Thank you very much. It's clear now.
NancyUK
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2019 11:05:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/15/2011
Posts: 770
Neurons: 101,720
It looks as if this is from an Edgar Wallace story - The Clue of the New Pin - written in 1923. Naturally it contains old-fashioned language from a different time, where most people would be familiar with the theatre and its terminology, perhaps.

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance, Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance. Ogden Nash
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