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alibey1917
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2019 7:07:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2018
Posts: 157
Neurons: 3,128
"As Skytrain reorganises the geographies of everyday life, Bangkok’s elite are starting to live, work and entertain themselves within a raised archipelago city of enclaves, which offer new concentrations of premium services and spaces geared to their needs, laced together along the raised urban plane by Skytrain lines."

Does the phrase "geared to their needs" refer to only "spaces" or "premium services and spaces"? Similarly, does the word "premium" refer to only "services" or "services and spaces"? And why, what is the rule? Thanks in advance.

The source: Vertical by Stephen Graham
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2019 8:20:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 33,174
Neurons: 208,218
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi alibey!

That's a LOT of adjectival phrases and words!

I would say that it works this way . . .
The "concentrations" consist of "services and spaces".

These "services and spaces" are premium, are geared to their needs, and "the concentrations" are laced together.

I don't know all the rules - or (to be truthful) I probably DO know them, but only by experience. I've never seen them written down, or heard anyone tell me.
To change it, you would need commas.
If you want "premium" to apply to "services", and "geared to their needs" to apply to "premium services, and spaces" it becomes awkward, needing more commas and maybe hyphens - and maybe you would need to rearrange the sequence of phrases (I'm not going to attempt that idea).

". . . which offer new concentrations of premium services and spaces geared to their needs, laced together along the raised urban plane by Skytrain lines."
"Premium" and "geared to their needs" apply to "services and spaces".
"laced together" applies to "concentrations of premium services and spaces geared to their needs".

". . . which offer new concentrations of premium services, and spaces geared to their needs, laced together along the raised urban plane by Skytrain lines."
"Premium" refers to "services"; "geared to their needs" applies to "spaces".
"laced together" applies to "concentrations of premium services, and spaces geared to their needs".

"New" in both cases, applies to the whole long noun-phrase which starts with "concentrations".
alibey1917
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2019 8:32:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2018
Posts: 157
Neurons: 3,128
Drag0nspeaker yazdı:
Hi alibey!

That's a LOT of adjectival phrases and words!

I would say that it works this way . . .
The "concentrations" consist of "services and spaces".

These "services and spaces" are premium, are geared to their needs, and "the concentrations" are laced together.

I don't know all the rules - or (to be truthful) I probably DO know them, but only by experience. I've never seen them written down, or heard anyone tell me.
To change it, you would need commas.
If you want "premium" to apply to "services", and "geared to their needs" to apply to "premium services, and spaces" it becomes awkward, needing more commas and maybe hyphens - and maybe you would need to rearrange the sequence of phrases (I'm not going to attempt that idea).

". . . which offer new concentrations of premium services and spaces geared to their needs, laced together along the raised urban plane by Skytrain lines."
"Premium" and "geared to their needs" apply to "services and spaces".
"laced together" applies to "concentrations of premium services and spaces geared to their needs".

". . . which offer new concentrations of premium services, and spaces geared to their needs, laced together along the raised urban plane by Skytrain lines."
"Premium" refers to "services"; "geared to their needs" applies to "spaces".
"laced together" applies to "concentrations of premium services, and spaces geared to their needs".

"New" in both cases, applies to the whole long noun-phrase which starts with "concentrations".


This is an excellent explanation, Drag0nspeaker, thanks a lot.
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