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A steady hand in governing of military affairs is more requisite than in times of peace, because an error committed in war... Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, September 26, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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A steady hand in governing of military affairs is more requisite than in times of peace, because an error committed in war may, perhaps, prove irremediable.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
kitten
Posted: Monday, September 26, 2011 1:09:17 AM

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>>>>> moving on.

I have yet to find the quote in context but I have read much of Sir Francis Bacon. Some of which, in the same vain as the above quote, and is quite applicable to todays standard of living.

However, I don't necessarily completely agree with the above quote.

A steady hand and head was required with respects to the Cuban Missle Crises. If President Kennedy and his advisors along with Premier Khrushchev had not a steady head and hand prior to a missle being fired then the after results would have been irremediable. Not in the the same sense Sir Bacon was familiar with.


>^,,^<


The poor object to being governed badly, whilst the rich object to being governed at all. G.K. Chesterton
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, September 26, 2011 6:27:13 AM

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This is from a letter in his collected writings having the full title of:

Quote:
ADVICE TO SIR GEORGE VILLIERS,
AFTERWARDS DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM,
WHEN HE BECAME FAVOURITE TO KING JAMES;
RECOMMENDING MANY IMPORTANT INSTRUCTIONS HOW TO GOVERN HIMSELF
IN THE STATION OF PRIME MINISTER.

WRITTEN BY SIR FRANCIS BACON, ON THE IMPORTUNITY OF HIS PATRON AND FRIEND.


The letter is organized under several topics, each with numbered points. This is from section V, on war and peace.

Quote:
22. He must make choice of expert and able commanders to conduct and manage the war, either against a foreign invasion, or a home rebellion; which must not be young and giddy, which dare, not only to fight, but to swear, and drink, and curse, neither fit to govern others, nor able to govern themselves.

23. Let not such be discouraged, if they deserve well, by misinformation, or for the satisfying the humours or ambition of others, perhaps out of envy, perhaps out of treachery, or other sinister ends. A steady hand in governing of military affairs is more requisite than in times of peace, because an error committed in war, may, perhaps, prove irremediable.


The works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England, Volume 2; http://books.google.com/books?id=HEdAAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA384&lpg=PA384, retrieved September 26, 2011

Edited to add:
I neglected to include the list of topics.

Quote:
For the facilitating of your despatches, my advice is farther, that you divide all the petitions, and the matters therein contained, under several heads: which, I conceive, may be fitly ranked into these eight sorts.
I. Matters that concern religion, and the church and churchmen.
II. Matters concerning justice, and the laws, and the professors thereof.
III. Councillors, and the council table, and the great offices and officers of the kingdom.
IV. Foreign negotiations and embassies.
V. Peace and war, both foreign and civil, and in that the navy and forts, and what belongs to them.
VI. Trade at home and abroad.
VII. Colonies, or foreign plantations.
VIII. The court and curiality.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, September 26, 2011 6:40:25 AM

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kitten wrote:

A steady hand and head was required with respects to the Cuban Missle Crises. If President Kennedy and his advisors along with Premier Khrushchev had not a steady head and hand prior to a missle being fired then the after results would have been irremediable. Not in the the same sense Sir Bacon was familiar with.


I think Frank got it right. The Cuban Missile Crisis was most certainly a military affair, even though no shots were actually fired.

Earlier in this same letter at the beginning of this section he writes:

Quote:
V. For peace and war, and those things which appertain to either; I in my own disposition and profession am wholly for peace, if please God to bless this kingdom therewith, as for many years past he hath done: and
1. I presume I shall not need to persuade you to the advancing of it; nor shall you need to persuade the king your master therein, for that he hath hitherto been another Solomon in this our Israel, and the motto which he hath chosen, "Beati pacifici," shows his own judgment: but he must use the means to preserve it, else such a jewel may be lost.


Either way, whether by systematic genocide or nuclear disaster, dead is dead. Like the song says: "Ain't gonna study war no more."

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
fiddle-fart
Posted: Monday, September 26, 2011 8:46:22 PM

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Location: Southern Indiana (close to nothing... next to nowh
Then what happenned with George W. Bush?
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