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"I feel badly"? I hope not. Options
rmberwin
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 9:33:09 PM

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I've several times heard the President say "I feel badly" about thus and so. But I've never heard mentioned that this is poor grammar!
sureshot
Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 12:36:49 AM
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rmberwin wrote:
I've several times heard the President say "I feel badly" about thus and so. But I've never heard mentioned that this is poor grammar!

______________________

In formal English, one should say "I feel bad" to convey the desired sense.
palapaguy
Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 1:26:46 AM

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rmberwin wrote:
I've several times heard the President say "I feel badly" about thus and so. But I've never heard mentioned that this is poor grammar!

Okay, I'll mention it. That is poor grammar.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 3:57:28 AM

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Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
To master a language you have to learn it in use. Actually, you have to pay attention to its social context and to who says what. What is correct in one particular situation is unacceptable in another.
Ravindra
Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 6:57:28 AM
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Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Agree with Adyl. Even if I do not use such words informally, I should know their meaning. Communication is a two-way system - I must make myself understandable to the one/ones I am talking to and I must be able to understand what I am told.

The capacity to learn is a gift; the ability to learn is a skill; the willingness to learn is a choice.
Brain Herbert
Romany
Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 10:41:39 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Rmberwin
I guess that whether you copy other people's bad language usage or not is up to each person. It IS incorrect and marks out the speaker as someone who is not well-educated or widely-read.

And actually - millions of people from countries & governments all over the wall do recognise that this particular speaker uses English in a way that does not befit an educated public speaker. Both his grammar and vocabulary use are constantly subject to scrutiny and comment.
BobShilling
Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 1:16:51 PM
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Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
Romany wrote:
It IS incorrect and marks out the speaker as someone who is not well-educated or widely-read.


I hear/see it more and more from quite well-educated people.

I don't understand why it is becoming more common. People who say they feel badly about something wouldn't dream of saying they feel well/sadly/happily about something
.
rmberwin
Posted: Friday, July 19, 2019 4:57:48 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 5/30/2012
Posts: 99
Neurons: 769
BobShilling wrote:
Romany wrote:
It IS incorrect and marks out the speaker as someone who is not well-educated or widely-read.


I hear/see it more and more from quite well-educated people.

I don't understand why it is becoming more common. People who say they feel badly about something wouldn't dream of saying they feel well/sadly/happily about something
.


This type of usage error is known as a 'hypercorrection'. Perhaps the most common is 'you and I' when 'me and you' is correct. I hear this all the time from news broadcasters, etc.
ozok
Posted: Saturday, July 20, 2019 10:25:07 AM
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ozok
Posted: Sunday, July 21, 2019 9:09:00 AM
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Joined: 7/24/2018
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Quote:

I guess that whether you copy other people's bad language usage or not is up to each person. It IS incorrect and marks out the speaker as someone who is not well-educated or widely-read.


Of course it is incorrect.

Language is constantly evolving. And this can go very quickly if used by an influential person such as the president of the USA.

We have AE and BE. Just a matter of time before the former is changed to TE.

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