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on one's way Options
nightdream
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 7:28:35 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/20/2015
Posts: 936
Neurons: 2,758
1) Is it nesessary to add "on one's way" or not? Is it acceptable to use "go" without "one's way"?


They had been going (on their way) very long and came across a hole.

They had been going (on their way) and saw a red fox running.






2) Is it acceptable to use "go" in the past as:


They went and went, went very long till dawn fell.

They went (on their way) very long and came across a hole.

They went (on their way) and saw a red fox running.


Blodybeef
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 9:31:22 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/15/2009
Posts: 745
Neurons: 538,866
Location: Ataşehir, Istanbul, Turkey
You could use more specific words, such as "walk", "ride", or "drive." This would make the sentences more meaningful and natural.


They had been walking for a long time and came across a hole.

They had been riding when they saw a red fox running.


I don't think this is very acceptable, nor does it sound natural to be used by grownups:
Quote:
They went and went, went very long till dawn fell.



Again, if you use more specific words, these should sound better :
Quote:
They went (on their way) very long and came across a hole.

They went (on their way) and saw a red fox running.
nightdream
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 10:10:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/20/2015
Posts: 936
Neurons: 2,758
No, they did not have been riding, they had been going (on foot). Is it nesessary to add "on their way"?



Blodybeef wrote:
You could use more specific words, such as "walk", "ride", or "drive." This would make the sentences more meaningful and natural.


They had been walking for a long time and came across a hole.

They had been riding when they saw a red fox running.


I don't think this is very acceptable, nor does it sound natural to be used by grownups:
Quote:
They went and went, went very long till dawn fell.



Again, if you use more specific words, these should sound better :
Quote:
They went (on their way) very long and came across a hole.

They went (on their way) and saw a red fox running.
Blodybeef
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 7:02:03 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/15/2009
Posts: 745
Neurons: 538,866
Location: Ataşehir, Istanbul, Turkey
Instead of "going on foot" you can say "walk." It is simpler. And, in my experience, when speaking or writing in English (or in any foreign language [well, even when using my native language]) I have noticed that simpler sentences are better. You are, after all, trying your message to be correctly understood by the receiving party.

If you really need to use the term "on their way" I'd suggest constructing the sentence like this :

"They had been on their way for a very long time when they came across a hole.

"They had been on their way when they saw a red fox running.



2) Is it acceptable to use "go" in the past as:


They went and went, went very long till dawn fell. (This could be ok, for a very early beginner or a child, but avoid it, if possible)

They went (on their way) very long and came across a hole. (I never came across with this kind of usage.)

They went (on their way) and saw a red fox running. (I never came across with this kind of usage either.)
nightdream
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 8:15:06 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/20/2015
Posts: 936
Neurons: 2,758
Thank you. I do not need to use "on one's way".

Then, are the variants acceptable as:


They had been going for a long time and (istead of "when") came across a hole.


They had been going (without "for a long time") and (instead of "when") saw a red fox running.



Blodybeef wrote:
Instead of "going on foot" you can say "walk." It is simpler. And, in my experience, when speaking or writing in English (or in any foreign language [well, even when using my native language]) I have noticed that simpler sentences are better. You are, after all, trying your message to be correctly understood by the receiving party.

If you really need to use the term "on their way" I'd suggest constructing the sentence like this :

"They had been on their way for a very long time when they came across a hole.

"They had been on their way when they saw a red fox running.



2) Is it acceptable to use "go" in the past as:


They went and went, went very long till dawn fell. (This could be ok, for a very early beginner or a child, but avoid it, if possible)

They went (on their way) very long and came across a hole. (I never came across with this kind of usage.)

They went (on their way) and saw a red fox running. (I never came across with this kind of usage either.)
Blodybeef
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 12:38:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/15/2009
Posts: 745
Neurons: 538,866
Location: Ataşehir, Istanbul, Turkey
nightdream wrote:
Thank you. I do not need to use "on one's way".

Then, are the variants acceptable as:


They had been going for a long time and (istead of "when") came across a hole.


They had been going (without "for a long time") and (instead of "when") saw a red fox running.



Well, "They had been walking for a long time and came across a hole." sounds better.

"They had been walking and saw a red fox running." This is acceptable, but sounds like it lacks some information. Because they saw a red fox running while they were walking, right?

Did their walk end when the saw a red fox running?

Was the purpose of the walk to see a red fox running?

Your sentence implies that their walk ended at the moment they saw a red fox running.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 1:08:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 33,174
Neurons: 208,218
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi nightdream.
Blodybeef is right.

There is nothing grammatically wrong with your sentences really - it is more a trouble with the choice of words.

"Go" is not an easy verb to play with (or to use as an example). It has too many meanings - and there are several idiomatic phrases which use "go".
You will not hear a native speaker use 'go' as a word on its own.
"Go" and "went" are not used without other data - you may go to somewhere, go from somewhere, go along a path, go to do something - but you rarely see a sentence which just says "They went" or "They went and went".

They had been travelling/walking/hiking for a long time and came across a hole.
They had been travelling/walking/hiking for a long time when they came across a hole.
They had been travelling/walking/hiking and saw a red fox running, so they stopped to watch.
They had been travelling/walking/hiking when they saw a red fox running, so they stopped to watch.
They had been going through the forest for a long time and came across a hole.
They went along the path till they came to a hole.
nightdream
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 4:56:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/20/2015
Posts: 936
Neurons: 2,758
Are the variants acceptable as:


They had been going for a long time and (istead of "when") came across a hole.


They had been going (without "for a long time") and (instead of "when") saw a red fox running.


They had been going for a long time and went till dawn came.




Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi nightdream.
Blodybeef is right.

There is nothing grammatically wrong with your sentences really - it is more a trouble with the choice of words.

"Go" is not an easy verb to play with (or to use as an example). It has too many meanings - and there are several idiomatic phrases which use "go".
You will not hear a native speaker use 'go' as a word on its own.
"Go" and "went" are not used without other data - you may go to somewhere, go from somewhere, go along a path, go to do something - but you rarely see a sentence which just says "They went" or "They went and went".

They had been travelling/walking/hiking for a long time and came across a hole.
They had been travelling/walking/hiking for a long time when they came across a hole.
They had been travelling/walking/hiking and saw a red fox running, so they stopped to watch.
They had been travelling/walking/hiking when they saw a red fox running, so they stopped to watch.
They had been going through the forest for a long time and came across a hole.
They went along the path till they came to a hole.
BobShilling
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 5:06:52 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 1,421
Neurons: 7,621
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
nightdream wrote:
Are the variants acceptable as:

They had been going for a long time and (istead of "when") came across a hole.

They had been going (without "for a long time") and (instead of "when") saw a red fox running.

They had been going for a long time and went till dawn came.


Why do you ignore the responses you receive, nightdream:

Blodybeef wrote:
You could use more specific words, such as "walk", "ride", or "drive." This would make the sentences more meaningful and natural.


Drag0nspeaker wrote:


"Go" is not an easy verb to play with (or to use as an example). It has too many meanings - and there are several idiomatic phrases which use "go".
You will not hear a native speaker use 'go' as a word on its own.
"Go" and "went" are not used without other data - you may go to somewhere, go from somewhere, go along a path, go to do something - but you rarely see a sentence which just says "They went" or "They went and went".


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