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Sightlines Options
alibey1917
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 3:16:16 AM

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"As geographers Jamie Peck, Elliot Siemiatycki and Elvin Wyly argue, the Vancouver model has been sold as a ‘winning combination of density, livability and sustainability – all rendered seductively real in the forest of glass-walled condominium towers that has colonised the downtown core since the late 1980s.’ 46Beneath the boosterist gloss, however, and despite laudable efforts of planners to protect key sightlines and integrate towers into the streetscapes below, they diagnose an effective suburbanisation of Vancouver’s downtown."

What does "sightlines" mean in this context?

The source: Stephen Graham's Vertical
lazarius
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 3:58:06 AM

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Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
alibey1917 wrote:
What does "sightlines" mean in this context?

The quality of being sightly, that is pleasing to the eye:

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/sightly

-
thar
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 4:21:25 AM

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not being sightly/sightliness (beauty), you missed the missing s. But a compound
sight + lines
ie the line you look along to look at something - the view

If you live in a city, and someone builds a ****ing great tall building in front of your area, it blocks your view of something nice, like the beach or the mountains or a historic building. It blocks a sightline.

So sightlines are the lines you look along to see a particular view.
.

eg say there is a popular park on a hill - people like to go there, have a picnic and take in the view of the city. Planners would not allow a developer to build a large building there that would block that sightline. Hopefully. Depends how corrupt the system is.


There was a lot of protest recently in London with building tall buildings that really messed up the view of St Paul's, which is an iconic sight on the London skyline. It is relatively new in historic terms - built after the great fire of 1666 - but it is very iconic and the argument "but this is progress, and my new building shaped like a penis will only enhance the view by completely blocking out the view of the dome of St Paul's" does not cut it with the public. Planning permission involves a public consultation, and if too may people or organisations complain, it can't go through, hopefully.

Apparently that is why The Shard has a pointed top - because it can't legally block the sightline but they still wanted it to be that tall.

Quote:

Have you ever wondered why The Shard in London, the tallest building in the European Union is pointed? Why didn't they build it straight up, so there would be more office space to sell?

The answer, as vlogger Tom Scott explains in his latest video, is because of London's arcane laws around sightlines.

Essentially, there are certain "protected views" that prevent skyscrapers being built blocking the way. The example used in the video is the view of St Paul's Cathedral from Richmond Park in South West London - but there are a number of others, including the view of both the Houses of Parliament and St Paul's from Primrose Hill in the North.




Quote:
A protected view or protected vista is the legal requirement within urban planning to preserve the view of a specific place or historic building from another location. The effect of a protected view is to limit the height of new buildings within or adjacent to the sightline between the two places so as to preserve the ability to see the landmark as a focus of the view. The protection may also cover the area behind the place or building concerned.

For example, in London views of St Paul's Cathedral[1] are protected from various prominent locations around the city. In Edinburgh, a 2005 skyline study compiled a list of almost 170 key views which will now be protected in the planning process.[2]

Protected views are not unique to the UK, also existing in places such as San Francisco which has some of the strictest limits in the world;[3] Portland, Oregon where the size of downtown blocks is kept low to maintain the views of Mount Hood from the West Hills; and the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, which has protected "view cones".[4][5]




but they keep trying. d'oh!
They cite the housing crisis - need more houses. More people come. Need more houses. More people come. Build over every bit of green space, block out every nice view. People finally realise it is a shitty place to live, and leave. Didn't need the houses after all! Whistle



Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 4:42:25 AM

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Joined: 5/1/2017
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Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
I am keen on photography and the word sightlines is familiar to me; it means field of view or range.
lazarius
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 5:01:39 AM

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Joined: 8/27/2016
Posts: 566
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Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
thar wrote:
not being sightly/sightliness (beauty), you missed the missing s. But a compound
sight + lines

My sight failed me - I didn't notice there was just one 's'. Yes the word is here on TFD:

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/sightline

Thank you.

-
alibey1917
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 6:03:35 AM

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Joined: 9/19/2018
Posts: 157
Neurons: 3,128
Thank you, friends, I got it.
alibey1917
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 6:05:54 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2018
Posts: 157
Neurons: 3,128
thar yazdı:
not being sightly/sightliness (beauty), you missed the missing s. But a compound
sight + lines
ie the line you look along to look at something - the view

If you live in a city, and someone builds a ****ing great tall building in front of your area, it blocks your view of something nice, like the beach or the mountains or a historic building. It blocks a sightline.

So sightlines are the lines you look along to see a particular view.
.

eg say there is a popular park on a hill - people like to go there, have a picnic and take in the view of the city. Planners would not allow a developer to build a large building there that would block that sightline. Hopefully. Depends how corrupt the system is.


There was a lot of protest recently in London with building tall buildings that really messed up the view of St Paul's, which is an iconic sight on the London skyline. It is relatively new in historic terms - built after the great fire of 1666 - but it is very iconic and the argument "but this is progress, and my new building shaped like a penis will only enhance the view by completely blocking out the view of the dome of St Paul's" does not cut it with the public. Planning permission involves a public consultation, and if too may people or organisations complain, it can't go through, hopefully.

Apparently that is why The Shard has a pointed top - because it can't legally block the sightline but they still wanted it to be that tall.

Alıntı:

Have you ever wondered why The Shard in London, the tallest building in the European Union is pointed? Why didn't they build it straight up, so there would be more office space to sell?

The answer, as vlogger Tom Scott explains in his latest video, is because of London's arcane laws around sightlines.

Essentially, there are certain "protected views" that prevent skyscrapers being built blocking the way. The example used in the video is the view of St Paul's Cathedral from Richmond Park in South West London - but there are a number of others, including the view of both the Houses of Parliament and St Paul's from Primrose Hill in the North.




Alıntı:
A protected view or protected vista is the legal requirement within urban planning to preserve the view of a specific place or historic building from another location. The effect of a protected view is to limit the height of new buildings within or adjacent to the sightline between the two places so as to preserve the ability to see the landmark as a focus of the view. The protection may also cover the area behind the place or building concerned.

For example, in London views of St Paul's Cathedral[1] are protected from various prominent locations around the city. In Edinburgh, a 2005 skyline study compiled a list of almost 170 key views which will now be protected in the planning process.[2]

Protected views are not unique to the UK, also existing in places such as San Francisco which has some of the strictest limits in the world;[3] Portland, Oregon where the size of downtown blocks is kept low to maintain the views of Mount Hood from the West Hills; and the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, which has protected "view cones".[4][5]




but they keep trying. d'oh!
They cite the housing crisis - need more houses. More people come. Need more houses. More people come. Build over every bit of green space, block out every nice view. People finally realise it is a shitty place to live, and leave. Didn't need the houses after all! Whistle

Thank you very much for this excellent explanation, thar.

Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 7:18:16 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,554
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
To give a further illustration of Thars answer , this is the view of St Pauls that has been protected.


St Pauls from the Millenium Bridge at night.
alibey1917
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 2:52:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2018
Posts: 157
Neurons: 3,128
Sarrriesfan yazdı:
To give a further illustration of Thars answer , this is the view of St Pauls that has been protected.


St Pauls from the Millenium Bridge at night.


Thank you, Sarrriesfan.
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