The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Hephaestion Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, July 11, 2019 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 28,487
Neurons: 84,639
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Hephaestion

Hephaestion was a Macedonian general who supervised the foundation of cities and colonies in Bactria, central Asia, and India. He was a close friend of Alexander the Great, who called him "my Patroclus"—in reference to the friend of the Greek hero Achilles. In 324 BCE, Hephaestion married Alexander's sister-in-law, Drypetis, but died suddenly in the same year at Ecbatana, the capital of ancient Media, in what is now northwestern Iran. How did Alexander mark Hephaestion's death? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Thursday, July 11, 2019 12:54:56 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2015
Posts: 7,256
Neurons: 3,440,910
Location: Kolkata, Bengal, India
Article of the Day
Hephaestion
Hephaestion was a Macedonian general who supervised the foundation of cities and colonies in Bactria, central Asia, and India. He was a close friend of Alexander the Great, who called him "my Patroclus"—in reference to the friend of the Greek hero Achilles. In 324 BCE, Hephaestion married Alexander's sister-in-law, Drypetis, but died suddenly in the same year at Ecbatana, the capital of ancient Media, in what is now northwestern Iran.
taurine
Posted: Thursday, July 11, 2019 1:42:53 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/20/2016
Posts: 1,529
Neurons: 111,091
Location: South Dublin, Ireland
It was and still is easy to denigrate a man by accusing him of being in a homosexual relationship. By sheer envy from people less successful, taking advantage in every possible situation from circumstances offering to them the satisfaction of feeding their own dishonesty and greed.

Sas? Nic. Sassnitz. Rug, ja? Rugen. Telemark in Harzgerode.
taurine
Posted: Thursday, July 11, 2019 6:32:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/20/2016
Posts: 1,529
Neurons: 111,091
Location: South Dublin, Ireland
The standard customary currency accepted by agreement was called nomisma.
Aristotle in Nicomachean Ethics in book 5 gives an interesting example of how the rate of exchange was stated. In his explanation, he claims that five beadstead are equal to one house, and the one house was equal to five minae.
Mina in silver was much less than mina in gold. Just like today's price for these metals quated in troy onuces on the Exchange.


Aristotle in Athenian Constitution, in chapter 10, wrote that Solon instituted weights corresponding to the currency. The talent weighed sixty-three minae.


Flavius Josephus in Antiquities of the Jews, in book 14 section 105 writes about a beam, which was made of solid beaten gold, of the weight of three hundred minae, each of which weighed two pounds and a half. Nevertheless, his unit or measure should be treated with caution as, for example, those pounds were not British pounds.

Silver obolus was 1/6 of drachma. Aristophanes in Wasps between lines 1388-1416 writes about loaf of bread worth an obolus.

In ancient Egypt the value of talent in gold also varied, some authors claiming to be worth of up to 5,000 kg.

I think that the problem of establishing the value of talent in ancient time could be taken as an interesting topic for really serious scientific scholar paper.
To sum up. If taking Aristotle as an authority on the question then talent might be worth on average 12 or 13 houses suitable for accomodation for five people. Yet, Aristotle was not alone and plenty of other ancient writers deserve to take their relations into consideration.


Sas? Nic. Sassnitz. Rug, ja? Rugen. Telemark in Harzgerode.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.