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Why is "inches" used when it is less than one inch? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Saturday, May 25, 2019 9:09:26 AM
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Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 5,177
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The plant grew 0.79 inches last year.

Why is "inches" used when the height is less than one inch?

Thanks.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, May 25, 2019 10:06:34 AM

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Koh Elaine wrote:
The plant grew 0.79 inches last year.

Why is "inches" used when the height is less than one inch?

Thanks.


We had a discussion about something similar to this in this topic on mile or miles.

We use "inches" for the same reason as "miles", as thar explained in his post at the link"

Quote:

"Yes, you use the plural when it is a decimal. A mile is one mile. Anything else is a number of miles.

1 One mile

1.1 One point one miles
0.9 Nought point nine miles
0.1 Point one miles
0 Zero miles
1.00 One point zero zero miles "

When using fractions, however, we tend to use "inch". A quarter of an inch; a half an inch; three quarters of an inch, but we sometimes drop the "of" and just say a quarter inch, a half inch, etc.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
thar
Posted: Saturday, May 25, 2019 11:39:33 AM

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Yes, normally SI units are divided into decimals - 1.23 cm

but inches are normally (although not exclusively) divided into fractions (half an inch, quarter of an inch, eighth, sixteenth, thirty-second, sixty-fourth.)

If you go to the effort to measure it to scientific exactitude, you would normally do it in cm!

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 25, 2019 4:52:54 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
thar wrote:
If you go to the effort to measure it to scientific exactitude, you would normally do it in cm!

Or thou!
(thousandths of an inch). Maybe it's not so common now, but it used to be the norm in engineering.
Pronounced /θaʊ/, not /ðaʊ/.

"The gap needs to be three thou for the optimum spark"
"Use good quality paper - six thou thick."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Saturday, May 25, 2019 8:25:30 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 5,177
Neurons: 21,368
Thanks to all of you.
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