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Sentence by using the word "steal" and "rob" Options
tracker890
Posted: Wednesday, May 15, 2019 10:10:39 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 3/30/2019
Posts: 132
Neurons: 643
Location: Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan
In order to understand the word "steal" and "rob", I made some example by myself as follows:

Steal:
(1) He stolen my watch from my room.
(2) My watch was stolen from my room.

Rob:
(1) He robbed me of the watch from my room.
(2) I was robbed of my watch from my room.

Are the sentences correct?
If not please help me to correct it.

Thank you for your time and consideration.


I will be grateful for any help you can provide. Matthew
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, May 15, 2019 11:17:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 11,167
Neurons: 56,794
tracker890 wrote:
In order to understand the word "steal" and "rob", I made some example by myself as follows:

Steal:
(1) He stolen my watch from my room. This should be, "He has stolen my watch from my room." You could also say, "He stole the watch from my room."
(2) My watch was stolen from my room. This one is okay.

Rob:
(1) He robbed me of the watch from my room. We would normally say, "He robbed me of my watch." The part about the room is not important, and would not normally be said.
(2) I was robbed of my watch from my room. This one is similar. "from my room" isn't necessary. You would only say it if you were asked where the watch was when it was stolen. "It was in my room".

Are the sentences correct?
If not please help me to correct it.

Thank you for your time and consideration.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, May 16, 2019 2:55:11 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 32,773
Neurons: 201,846
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello tracker.
I agree with FounDit - British English and American English agree.

It is not common to use a 'location' and an object in the same sentence using "robbed".
The 'location' can be made the subject of the sentence.

I was robbed of my watch.
My room was robbed.

I was robbed of my watch from my room.

He stole my watch from my room.
My watch was stolen from my room.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
tracker890
Posted: Thursday, May 16, 2019 9:13:35 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 3/30/2019
Posts: 132
Neurons: 643
Location: Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hello tracker.
I agree with FounDit - British English and American English agree.

It is not common to use a 'location' and an object in the same sentence using "robbed".
The 'location' can be made the subject of the sentence.

I was robbed of my watch.
My room was robbed.

I was robbed of my watch from my room.

He stole my watch from my room.
My watch was stolen from my room.



clear! Thank you ^^

I will be grateful for any help you can provide. Matthew
tracker890
Posted: Thursday, May 16, 2019 9:14:18 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 3/30/2019
Posts: 132
Neurons: 643
Location: Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan
FounDit wrote:
tracker890 wrote:
In order to understand the word "steal" and "rob", I made some example by myself as follows:

Steal:
(1) He stolen my watch from my room. This should be, "He has stolen my watch from my room." You could also say, "He stole the watch from my room."
(2) My watch was stolen from my room. This one is okay.

Rob:
(1) He robbed me of the watch from my room. We would normally say, "He robbed me of my watch." The part about the room is not important, and would not normally be said.
(2) I was robbed of my watch from my room. This one is similar. "from my room" isn't necessary. You would only say it if you were asked where the watch was when it was stolen. "It was in my room".

Are the sentences correct?
If not please help me to correct it.

Thank you for your time and consideration.


Vary clear! Thank you ^^

I will be grateful for any help you can provide. Matthew
srirr
Posted: Friday, May 17, 2019 3:01:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009
Posts: 7,586
Neurons: 385,430
In addition to what has already been said, please notice the difference between the connotations of the two words.

If the watch is stolen, it means the act was done in my absence or without my knowledge and I may not be aware of it till after some time. But if I am robbed, it means he took it forcefully from me and the incidence was always in my knowledge.

Stealing may not be forceful, but robbery is always forceful and often violent.


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
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