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Gentleman Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 12:00:00 AM
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Gentleman

In English law, a gentleman was one who bore a coat of armor, was entitled to bear arms, and ranked above yeomen. However, by the 19th century, the word’s association with social rank had diminished, and rather than signify a distinction of blood, the term came to describe a man who is cultured, courteous, and well-educated. Today, it is often used, alongside "lady," to emphasize norms expected in polite society. What qualities are associated with the Confucian "gentleman," the junzi? More...
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 1:19:30 AM

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Article of the Day
Gentleman
In English law, a gentleman was one who bore a coat of armor, was entitled to bear arms, and ranked above yeomen. However, by the 19th century, the word’s association with social rank had diminished, and rather than signify a distinction of blood, the term came to describe a man who is cultured, courteous, and well-educated. Today, it is often used, alongside "lady," to emphasize norms expected in polite society.
Ken White
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 3:18:35 AM

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Actually the term is 'Coat of Arms' originating in Medieval times to identify Knights (who wore armour in tournaments and contests) Knights were more-or-less the Medieval version of mercenaries or private soldiers with allegiances to powerful landowners. With the advent and rise of organised military and modern weapons, Knights became obsolete, so their heraldry morphed into 'Gentlemen'.
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 4:15:53 AM

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Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
Daemon wrote:
Gentleman

In English law, a gentleman was one who bore a coat of armor, was entitled to bear arms, and ranked above yeomen. However, by the 19th century, the word’s association with social rank had diminished, and rather than signify a distinction of blood, the term came to describe a man who is cultured, courteous, and well-educated. Today, it is often used, alongside "lady," to emphasize norms expected in polite society. What qualities are associated with the Confucian "gentleman," the junzi? More...
thar
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 5:04:03 AM

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clan, type, birth - genus, gender, genre, generation, genesis

non-Jewish type, clan - gentile


honourable - archaic gentil

polite - genteel

kind, soft - gentle

non-professional, amateur - gentleman vs players; gentleman farmer


(terrible how gentlemen have initials + esquire, but players just have surnames!)




form of address - ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls.

gender of toilets!

a man of culture and style





and taste in fish paste!



Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 8:45:08 AM

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In English law, a gentleman was one who bore a coat of armor, was entitled to bear arms, and ranked above yeomen. However, by the 19th century, the word’s association with social rank had diminished, and rather than signify a distinction of blood, the term came to describe a man who is cultured, courteous, and well-educated. Today, it is often used, alongside "lady," to emphasize norms expected in polite society.
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