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Cindy said, "Judy would go to the beach on the weekend." Options
Reiko07
Posted: Saturday, February 9, 2019 4:08:56 PM

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Do the following two sentences mean the same thing?

(1) Cindy said, "Judy would go to the beach on the weekend."

(2) Cindy said (that) Judy would go to the beach on the weekend.
[NOT ... that Judy would have gone to ...]

These are my original sentences.

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, February 9, 2019 6:09:11 PM

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Reiko07 wrote:
Do the following two sentences mean the same thing?

(1) Cindy said, "Judy would go to the beach on the weekend."

(2) Cindy said (that) Judy would go to the beach on the weekend.
[NOT ... that Judy would have gone to ...]

These are my original sentences.


The first sentence is wrongly punctuated. It is reported speech and must be written as (2).

To correct (1), you would have to punctuate it similar to:

(1) Cindy said, "Judy said she would go to the beach on the weekend". (American style punctuation)
Cindy is quoting Judy.

(2) Cindy said (that) Judy would go to the beach on the weekend.
[NOT ... that Judy would have gone to ...]

In this case, both mean the same thing.



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Reiko07
Posted: Saturday, February 9, 2019 6:16:24 PM

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Thank you very much, FounDit. Dancing

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, February 9, 2019 8:46:09 PM
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Um...If it's reported speech then it's very unlikely that Cindy said: "Guess what? Judy would go to the beach on the weekend."

She would have said instead "Guess what? Judy's going to the beach on the weekend."

The second sentence is the one which correctly uses "would go".

Reiko07
Posted: Saturday, February 9, 2019 8:55:51 PM

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Romany wrote:


Um...If it's reported speech then it's very unlikely that Cindy said: "Guess what? Judy would go to the beach on the weekend."

She would have said instead "Guess what? Judy's going to the beach on the weekend."

The second sentence is the one which correctly uses "would go".


Thank you very much, Romany.

Please read DEFNITION #12 in this entry.

I think I should have written something like this:

(3) Cindy said, "Judy would always/often/occasionally/etc go to the beach on the weekend."

I suppose native BrE speakers would use "at weekends" instead of "on the weekend".

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 8:07:20 AM
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Reiko -

No that still isn't correct: quotation marks after "X said:.." indicate you are quoting verbatim (exactly) everything someone said. That's why we call them "quotation marks" - they indicate EXACTLY the speakers words.

The speaker would not have said: "Judy would often go..." She's giving you that informatin, yes, but that's not how she would have said it. (Unless Judy's dead, or something and she's describing things Judy used to do.)

So the sentence itself is fine: to say that Cindy had said the Judy would always/often/occasionally go the the beach on weekends is perfect. But the minute you put quotation marks around what was said you have to use the exact words the speaker used Candy said "Judy always[/often/occasionally] goes to the beach on weekends." the "would" doesn't appear in the direct quote.

We had a thread recently (unfortunately I can't remember the name of it) discussing the fact that Americans use "at" the weekend/s. Brits and others say "on" or "over".
BobShilling
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 8:35:02 AM
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Romany wrote:
The speaker would not have said: "Judy would often go..." She's giving you that informatin, yes, but that's not how she would have said it. (Unless Judy's dead, or something and she's describing things Judy used to do.)


For this speaker of BrE, the direct

Cindy said(,) "Judy would (often) go to the beach at the weekend/at weekends".

can be reported as

Cindy said (that) Judy would (often) go to the beach at the weekend/at weekends.

I see nothing at all wrong with the direct-speech version.
Audiendus
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 9:01:53 AM
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Romany wrote:
We had a thread recently (unfortunately I can't remember the name of it) discussing the fact that Americans use "at" the weekend/s. Brits and others say "on" or "over".

No, Brits say "at" or "over", never "on" (not in my part of Britain, anyway!).
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 2:21:06 PM

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I don't know if this is the same for everyone, but I have totally different meanings for "at/on the weekend" and "at/on the weekends".

To me, "on the weekend" (which I would say "at the weekend") means "sometime during Saturday and/or Sunday this week".
"On the weekends" means "sometime during Saturday and/or Sunday, each weekend during some past period".

So "Judy would go to the beach on the weekend" is either wrong or it's a very old-fashioned (archaic) use of 'would' to mean "wants to".
"Judy would go to the beach on the weekend" = "Judy wants to go to the beach this weekend."

"Judy would often go to the beach at weekends" means "At some time in the past (probably a period which has already been mentioned), Judy often used to go to the beach on Saturday or Sunday."

The sentence 'Cindy said, "Judy would go to the beach on the weekend." ' doesn't work well on its own. It sounds incomplete or archaic.

It needs some sort of time-label (and the 's' on 'weekends') or writing in modern English.

'Cindy said, "When we were children, Judy would go to the beach on/at/over the weekends." '
OR
'Cindy said, "Judy wants to go to the beach on/at/over the weekend." '

To fit with definition #12, it would be the first choice.

It could also be said :
'Cindy said that, when we were children, Judy would go to the beach on/at/over the weekends.'

(NOTE Your sentence #2 - 'Cindy said that Judy would go to the beach on the weekend.' is reported speech for "Cindy said, "Judy will go to the beach on the weekend." - meaning 'next weekend - the one at the end of this week'.)
This is definition #1 of your OALD article, not definition #12.
From their answers, both FounDit and Romany understood this to be what your sentences were saying.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Reiko07
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 2:37:57 PM

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Romany, Bob, and Audiendus. Thank you very much.

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Reiko07
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 2:42:47 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
(and the 's' on 'weekends')

Thank you very much, DS. Is the following version natural?

(4) Cindy said, "Judy would often go to the beach on weekends."


My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 8:33:16 PM

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Yes - for a habit at sometime in the past.
Personally, I'd say it a little less 'formally' - "Judy'd often go to the beach weekends" OR "Judy used to go to the beach most weekends."

However, "at" or "on" are both very common.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Reiko07
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 8:49:33 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"Judy used to go to the beach most weekends."

Thanks a lot.

(5) Cindy said, "Judy used to go to the beach most weekends."

Could you please transform this sentence into a reported-speech one?

I expect used to to remain unchanged.

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 9:10:35 PM

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Yes - "used to" is an odd auxiliary which is never inflected differently.

"Cindy said that Judy used to go to the beach most weekends."

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Reiko07
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 9:11:48 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Yes - "used to" is an odd auxiliary which is never inflected differently.

"Cindy said that Judy used to go to the beach most weekends."

Thank you very much.

My English is probably at CEFR A1 or A2 level.
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