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Elemental: the periodic table at 150 Options
coag
Posted: Sunday, February 3, 2019 3:28:24 PM

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Source: The Guardian

"This year marks the 150th anniversary of the publication of the first periodic table."
"Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev laid out his vision for ordering the chemical world in 1869"

Possibly the world’s oldest extant copy of Mendeleev’s periodic table


The European Chemical Society’s periodic table of the elements, outlining their availability, derivation and use in smartphones



"Mendeleev had only 61 known elements at the time to sort", currently there are 118 elements in the periodic table.

Current periodic table


There are concerns in the European Chemical Society (EuChemS) that some chemical elements may become scarce. These elements, called the endangered elements, are marked with warm colors in the above EuChemS' table.

Some endangered chemical elements are as follows. (Some uses of these elements are given in parentheses)

zinc, silver, helium (cooling in MRI), gallium (manufacturing of semiconductors) -- serious threat in the next 100 years

chromium (stainless steel), platinum (temperature sensors, catalytic converters), cobalt (manufacturing of corrosion and
wear-resistant alloys) -- rising threat from increased use

copper, gold, nickel, neodymium (magnets for electrical motors) -- limited availability, future risk to supply

Some chemical elements that future generations won't have to worry about are:
iron, aluminium, hydrogen, nitrogen, silicon (silicon dioxide is the major constituent of sand), carbon (we don't know what to do with CO2).
thar
Posted: Sunday, February 3, 2019 5:54:17 PM

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I like 3D version which put the lanthanides and actinides in their true place, not in boxes.
It shows the logic of the shell filling order so much more clearly.

I wasn't thinking of this, but the point is the same.

Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Monday, February 4, 2019 5:47:30 AM

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I am a little worried by this new concept of "endangered elements". I wonder if they have in mind imposing regulations on industries to limit the use of these elements in order to preserve these elements' natural diversity that existed prior to industrial age.

Plus bury all the fossil fuels back in where they belong.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, February 4, 2019 7:59:16 AM

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That explains why metals investment-brokers advise buying silver Crowns, Rand and Dollars - rather than gold sovereigns. Silver is much more rare than gold and is becoming more scarce - so its value is increasing rapidly.

"Putting elements back" can sometimes be pretty tricky - unburning smoke and ash to produce coal is an action which hasn't been mastered yet.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Monday, February 4, 2019 8:59:43 AM

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What makes me worry is their choice of words: endangered elements...

While making no sense from scientific point of view, as chemical elements don't go anywhere from the planet, and the fact that rare elements are extracted from earth and used in various devices doesn't really limit their avalability for future uses provided there's a system for recycling, this wording does echo other similar constructions (endangered species etc) that in the past have grown into various regulatory requirements. So I wonder if it's the only reason the word "endangered" has been used.

I guess Romany will not be happy with the above sentence, looks it's too long for her taste. Dancing

I am not against environment protection, I only think we better be very cautious and reasonable about mounting various regulations and restrictions. E.g. in my view stimulating recycling of waste would be a much better response than imposing any limitations on the use of what they call "endangered elements". Even if (and I doubt it) recycling proves to be more expensive than extraction of those elements from natural deposits, prices will take that into account, and that's it. I am worried by the trend in certain quarters to limit and regulate everything.
coag
Posted: Monday, February 4, 2019 8:11:44 PM

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Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
, as chemical elements don't go anywhere from the planet,

Hydrogen and helium do (Atmospheric escape). But hydrogen is not a problem, we have have a lot of hydrogen.

Helium can be a problem. We don't have much helium and once helium is released to the air it's gone forever. It eventually escapes to outer space.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, February 6, 2019 5:10:20 AM
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Kirill - ya got me!

I did indeed read the sentence thinking, in passing, "that's a bloody long sentence."

So I really did LOL when I read your comment. Dancing
Blodybeef
Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2019 4:42:39 AM

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It will all get back to normal in a couple of centuries when the factor depleting the elements is eliminated.



“Integrity is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching." ― C.S. Lewis
coag
Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2019 8:38:33 AM

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I like this T-shirt.
anton exobio
Posted: Saturday, March 2, 2019 2:34:48 PM

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I look forward to the discovery of... superactinides.


"I got a haircut and no one noticed." - William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, March 3, 2019 11:13:31 AM

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Kirill Vorobyov wrote:
What makes me worry is their choice of words: endangered elements...

While making no sense from scientific point of view, as chemical elements don't go anywhere from the planet, and the fact that rare elements are extracted from earth and used in various devices doesn't really limit their avalability for future uses provided there's a system for recycling, this wording does echo other similar constructions (endangered species etc) that in the past have grown into various regulatory requirements. So I wonder if it's the only reason the word "endangered" has been used.
"Endangered" is often used to trigger a fear reaction in people, and we do seem to have an awful lot of people who live their lives in fear of -- well, everything.

I agree we can do a lot with recycling. That has always seemed to me to be a good idea. I have some doubts about the idea of elements being limited. We have often thought this was true about a good many things, only to find ways to improve the ability to not only find, but to extract new deposits.

I guess Romany will not be happy with the above sentence, looks it's too long for her taste. Dancing

I am not against environment protection, I only think we better be very cautious and reasonable about mounting various regulations and restrictions. E.g. in my view stimulating recycling of waste would be a much better response than imposing any limitations on the use of what they call "endangered elements". Even if (and I doubt it) recycling proves to be more expensive than extraction of those elements from natural deposits, prices will take that into account, and that's it. I am worried by the trend in certain quarters to limit and regulate everything.

I agree. This is the fear response of many in society. It limits innovation, discovery, and exploration. It's quite possible, new ways of accessing the elements we need will be found, not only on Earth, but quite possibly the moon, Mars, and space bodies. But if we simply shut down out of fear, none of these things could happen. So it remains the obligation of the "can-do" types to continue the advancements made so far and into the future.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
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