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uncooked (pronunciation) Options
onsen
Posted: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 7:15:36 PM
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Hello,

Harrap’s Standard Learners’ English Dictionary shows the pronunciation of the adjective 'uncooked' as [ʌnˈkukd] while Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries (’’) as /ˌʌnˈkʊkt/.
(colouring added)

Where does this difference come from?

Thank you.
thar
Posted: Thursday, January 24, 2019 3:42:42 AM

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When you say it each way, can you hear much difference?

The same way that words can be spelt/spelled differently - in the end there is not much difference.

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, January 24, 2019 4:29:07 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Some even say it ŭn-ko͝okt′


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 24, 2019 4:37:58 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Some even say it ŭn-ko͝okt′

Doesn't everyone who is cultured and properly educated?

It's not spelled "uncucked"!

Moon, soon, cook.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Thursday, January 24, 2019 6:06:19 AM

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Yes, I originally thought it related to the vowel, before I saw the coloured part.

I was going to say the difference was about 50 miles. The pronunciations given in dictionaries are 'standard English' spoken in parts of south-east England. That includes London, but most people in London came from somewhere else within at least a couple of generations, so that doesn't really count.
Most of Britain does not speak standard southern English!

even the simplest distinction of dialect shows how unrepresentative it is.

RuthP
Posted: Thursday, January 24, 2019 12:34:15 PM

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Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
onsen wrote:
Hello,

Harrap’s Standard Learners’ English Dictionary shows the pronunciation of the adjective 'uncooked' as [ʌnˈkukd] while Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries (’’) as /ˌʌnˈkʊkt/.
(colouring added)

Where does this difference come from?

Thank you.

AE makes the ending sound "d"; BE uses "t". This is a general rule only.

AE can use the "t" sound with some (<< vectors of importance pointing at "some") verbs, primarily those that end in "n": burnt, learnt. (I think, there may be others.) It is not very common, and if we use it it is spelt (<< another one!) that way. "Spelt" is, however, driving my AE spell check nuts. This usage is not common in AE, just not wrong.

We'd not use it on "uncooked". It may be that what are called "syllabic consonants": l, m, n, & r, that can replace vowels, may be followed by "t" for past tense. I cannot think of any "r" endings just now, though, that take a "t", and I've no evidence this is actually true. It's just that the words I can think of where one might use "t" in AE seem to fit that pattern.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, January 25, 2019 2:35:05 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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My normal speech often uses an indistinguishable d/t sound (even I can't say which it sounds like) with many verbs.

**************
Now I've listened to myself a bit . . .

Spelled and spelt, burned and burnt, learned and learnt - - - seem to tend more towards a 'd' when followed by 'a', but more towards a 't' when followed by 'the', so it's obviously a case of which is more natural as a transition from the previous syllable and to the following one (in my case, but that's probably fairly common).

I learnt the poem easily. (In fact, it almost disappears completely.)
In 'normal not-too-casual' speech, it could sound like "learn t-the poem". If I were to slip into Lancashire colloquial, it would be "learn ʔ'poem" (with nothing more than a glottal stop/plosive).
I learned a lot of poems at school. This is always (casual, formal or dialect) "learn d'alot". The transition between 'n' and 'd' seems more of a pause than the gap between the words.

Stress also plays a part.
I learnt that poem.
I learned THAT poem, but not the other one.


**********
From the couple of examples I can think of, verbs ending "r" seem to always have a "d" sound. There also seem to be a disproportionate percentage of irregulars ending with 'r'.

I feared it.
The stain marred the surface.
I heard it. (though the vowel changes, it's still "-rd", not "-rt")


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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