The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

what other language(s), are most relative to Russian Options
lse123cpp
Posted: Saturday, September 10, 2011 5:25:59 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/10/2011
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: Cyprus
I am currently Skype learning Russian, well I am curious what other language(s), are most relative to Russian [meaning the easiest can mastered, once Russian mastered]? By "mastered" here I just mean learned well not more...

Belo-Russian
Ukrainian
Baltic Languages

what is the sequence from easiest earn to most difficult...please list 5-6 lang at most!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, September 15, 2011 7:17:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 41,657
Neurons: 404,512
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Baltic languages (Latvian and Lithuanian) are not Slavic, but Polish, Slovak, Czech, Slovene, Serbo-Croatian, Bulgarian and Macedonian are the next ones close, after the Belarusian and Ukranian you mentioned.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Apple7
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 4:46:46 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/4/2011
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: Russia
As a native Russian-speaker I would say that I can understand almost all basic speech in Belarusian or Ukranian while I can't in other Slavic languages.




I'm a native Russian speaker learning English. If you are a native English speaker -> Russian, pls, contact me to Skype
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 8:31:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 41,657
Neurons: 404,512
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
TFD:

The Balto-Slavic language group consists of the Baltic and Slavic languages, belonging to the Indo-European family of languages. Baltic and Slavic languages share several linguistic traits not found in any other Indo-European branch, which points to the period of common development. However, there is an ongoing debate on the nature of that relationship. Some claim they were genetically related, and others explain similarities by prolonged language contact.


Genealogical linguistics theories change during times as well as other scientific theories tend to do. Now some are putting Baltic and Slavonic languages together in a same sub-branch or major group. Few decades ago there were theories to link Finnic (Finno-Ugric) languages with Baltic group.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.