The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

What do you call this type of sentence? Options
Tella
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 11:48:42 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/13/2014
Posts: 31
Neurons: 47,918
I'm trying to categorize grammar and got stuck on the type of sentence with two subjects/predicates where one of them is also an object:

-A man who you know loves you.
-Saw what I thought was interesting.
-A person I know keeps a secret.

Etc...
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 3:44:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 32,551
Neurons: 199,178
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Well, I would call the first and third ones "sentences" . . .
The second is a phrase - probably the predicate of a sentence.

Analysing the two sentences, I find that the subject of each is a noun-phrase ("A man who you know" and "A person I know").

Therefore, I suppose you could call them "Sentences with noun-phrases as their subjects".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Tella
Posted: Monday, January 7, 2019 5:06:57 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/13/2014
Posts: 31
Neurons: 47,918
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Well, I would call the first and third ones "sentences" . . .
The second is a phrase - probably the predicate of a sentence.

Analysing the two sentences, I find that the subject of each is a noun-phrase ("A man who you know" and "A person I know").

Therefore, I suppose you could call them "Sentences with noun-phrases as their subjects".


Complicated, isn't it? Especially when trying for a concise name. Thank you!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.