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Frell ( slang words) Options
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 1:10:30 PM

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Hi
What part of speech is "frell"?

Frell:
a general swear word and exclamation used on the TV series Farscape. Also frelled ("We're frelled,") frelling ("Close your frelling mouth.")

What the frell do you think you're doing?
Oh, frell!


I've seen Thar, said:
What the frell? Is this in two places at once? Anxious

I translated "what the frell? ", but Google translation has returned a translation in Arabic as the translation of "what the smell".

Is it like "what the hell?", etc.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 1:45:02 PM

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(edited)
A bit of background:
I don't swear in front of my parents (mostly), my students, or my bosses - so I am not going to swear for all eternity (or until the internet becomes obsolete) on an internet post - not if I can help it and for no good reason. Hence the euphemism. I choose to use a word with the right associations to me, (and one that is fun) but one that has no negative associations for 'society'. 'Frell' is not a swear-word, (it is not a real word at all, just one made up by the writer of the series) but saying it in my head gave me the required sense of release to express my confusion. Angel

A vast amount of human ingenuity has, over the centuries and presumably over the millenia, gone into saying some things to avoid saying other things which are not quite nice (or acceptable to religion), while making clear what it is you actually mean. Ah, isn't human communication great? d'oh!
Romany
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 1:50:32 PM
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It begins with "f". Thus it stands for "fuck". It is a way to say something impolite in a polite way. It's also a quick way to continue in a completely different way, if you've already said the initial "f".

It originated in a Sci/fi cartoon series.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 1:57:57 PM

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It is a "minced oath", the writers of Farscape use the word "frell" when real people would use another word beginning with "F".

Similarly the TV "Battlestar Galactica" uses the word "Frack" to replace the "F" word, everyone knows what they really mean.

I think writers of SciFi shows have more licence to make up unusual words.

Sometimes writers try to get away with things, in the TV "Buffy the Vanpire Slayer" there were two British characters Giles and Spike, sometimes they would speak lines of dialogue that included words that were very rude in British English but not understood in America. This meant that the BBC had to bleep out the words when the episodes were shown here.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
thar
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 2:14:08 PM

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Romany wrote:

It begins with "f". Thus it stands for "fuck". It is a way to say something impolite in a polite way. It's also a quick way to continue in a completely different way, if you've already said the initial "f".

It originated in a Sci/fi cartoon series.


Cartoon!
Noooooo! Animatronics by the Muppet God, but the rest is makeup and lots of body paint!

I have just checked and there is a translation of some of the Farscape slang, but the funniest part is the translations are so polite.

Quote:
Dren
A noun used to describe something unpleasant or of little or no value, also referring to the by-products of biological creatures.
Example - The vital threekay wire purchased recently on a commerce planet turns out to be string.

"Why the frell(qv) did you let yourself be talked into buying this dren, Rygel, you son of a drannit(qv)!".

Translation - "That may not have been the wisest purchase you've ever made Rygel, old man."



Greebol
A Nebari word for a daft, inexperienced or foolish person.
Example - Whilst under heavy fire by hostile aliens, John manages to blow up his pulse rifle.

"You frelling(qv) greebol Crichton! Why not just shoot us all, save those thoddos(qv) the trouble?"

Translation - "You silly billy Crichton. Why, you might as well save those nasty chaps the trouble of shooting us and do it yourself at this rate."


Tralk
Insult implying that a woman is a lady of easy virtue.
Example - D'Argo and Crichton find themselves invited into the boudoir of a four-breasted, sultry alien woman, to Chiana's annoyance.

"I can't believe those two just went with that rancid little tralk! She's leading them around by the mivonks(qv)!"

Translation - "I can't believe those two just left with that disreputable woman. It seems their heads have been turned by the sight of her assets."



Yotz
Hynerian expletive used a lot by Rygel, meaning something like hell.
Example - a shimmering, twirling blue tunnel appears ahead of Moya, threatening to suck her in.

"What the yotz is that? Has that thoddo(qv) Crichton been frelling(qv) around with the controls again?"

Translation - "What in the name of goodness could that be? Has Crichton re-adjusted the controls again?"


Of course this is just someone's ideas of what they mean. None were ever explained, but you got the idea.


The guy who wrote Buffy also wrote future-set sci-fi Firefly, where they swore in what sounded like Chinese. Makes perfect sense that it becomes the future lingua franca of humans. I have no idea if it meant anything, or if they had to bleep out whole sections of it in Chinese-speaking countries. Whistle
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 3:02:06 PM

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thar wrote:
Romany wrote:

It begins with "f". Thus it stands for "fuck". It is a way to say something impolite in a polite way. It's also a quick way to continue in a completely different way, if you've already said the initial "f".

It originated in a Sci/fi cartoon series.


Cartoon!
Noooooo! Animatronics by the Muppet God, but the rest is makeup and lots of body paint!

I have just checked and there is a translation of some of the Farscape slang, but the funniest part is the translations are so polite.

Quote:
Dren
A noun used to describe something unpleasant or of little or no value, also referring to the by-products of biological creatures.
Example - The vital threekay wire purchased recently on a commerce planet turns out to be string.

"Why the frell(qv) did you let yourself be talked into buying this dren, Rygel, you son of a drannit(qv)!".

Translation - "That may not have been the wisest purchase you've ever made Rygel, old man."



Greebol
A Nebari word for a daft, inexperienced or foolish person.
Example - Whilst under heavy fire by hostile aliens, John manages to blow up his pulse rifle.

"You frelling(qv) greebol Crichton! Why not just shoot us all, save those thoddos(qv) the trouble?"

Translation - "You silly billy Crichton. Why, you might as well save those nasty chaps the trouble of shooting us and do it yourself at this rate."


Tralk
Insult implying that a woman is a lady of easy virtue.
Example - D'Argo and Crichton find themselves invited into the boudoir of a four-breasted, sultry alien woman, to Chiana's annoyance.

"I can't believe those two just went with that rancid little tralk! She's leading them around by the mivonks(qv)!"

Translation - "I can't believe those two just left with that disreputable woman. It seems their heads have been turned by the sight of her assets."



Yotz
Hynerian expletive used a lot by Rygel, meaning something like hell.
Example - a shimmering, twirling blue tunnel appears ahead of Moya, threatening to suck her in.

"What the yotz is that? Has that thoddo(qv) Crichton been frelling(qv) around with the controls again?"

Translation - "What in the name of goodness could that be? Has Crichton re-adjusted the controls again?"


Of course this is just someone's ideas of what they mean. None were ever explained, but you got the idea.


The guy who wrote Buffy also wrote future-set sci-fi Firefly, where they swore in what sounded like Chinese. Makes perfect sense that it becomes the future lingua franca of humans. I have no idea if it meant anything, or if they had to bleep out whole sections of it in Chinese-speaking countries. Whistle


I have no idea either but apparently it was real Mandarin Chinese words not just made up sounds.
http://fireflychinese.kevinsullivansite.net/phrase/a.html

I sometimes run Firefly RPG games this comes in handy.






I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 3:23:59 PM
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I listened to a discussion the other night which was about the way both forming and expressing certain sounds affects us in different ways.

The "sh" sounds gentle but it can also be used to express pain or discomfort as well; hence it's use after stubbing the toe, etc. The 'f' sound is also one made when tring to bite the lip in pain or discomfort (Take with as many grains of salt as needed).

My go-to reaction either to stubbed toes or intense frustration/disgust is just a noise, really. It's a sort of hybrid of the African/Chinese/Melanesian "aiiyeeeee" . It has earned me a few looks sometimes - but never from African, Chinese or Melanesian people!



thar
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 3:45:09 PM

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As an exclamation, one of my enduring fall-backs is the German Scheisse! The combination of sh- and sibilance and length of vowel seems to really hit the spot. And with no need for any self-regulation. Whistle

But I like the sci-fi ones because you can't take yourself too seriously when you use them.


It is really weird, though. I say 'oops' (unstressed ups/wups) like something out of a - I don't know what. I never chose to say 'oops' or intended to say 'oops'. I despise 'oops'. But I still I sometimes say 'oops'. d'oh!
(No, I do not say oops-a-daisy. I have some street cred. I do, don't I? Please say yes! )
RuthP
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 4:00:20 PM

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I have a couple of comments on neologisms in science fiction and one big off-topic comment for the end.

Sarrriesfan commented that science fiction (see the off-topic comment) writers have a greater licence to make up new words. This is true and it makes sense for a couple of reasons.

1) SF (see the off-topic comment) frequently deals with far in the future and far away. One needs a way to show the reader or viewer that they are no longer at home. Language will change because a great deal of time has passed. Society may change with time and this will engender language change: the Firefly series / Serenity movie, which posits an English-based language with a fair amount of Chinese borrowing is an example.

2) Language will change if one is living on or visiting another planet: there will surely be new things which will need names. The new things will probably result in novel events, which will in turn elicit new (verbal) responses.

3) The biggie: If there are aliens, they certainly will not be speaking English or Chinese to start with. One must, again, assume cross-cultural exchange.

OFF-TOPIC: OK, I realize I have already lost this battle. I have lost it, because even within the field "SciFi" has become acceptable. However, I am old. I was very young when I started to read SF. At that time, science fiction was still in a literary ghetto, not approved of by the literati and read only by nerds. (I started nerdity young.)

As far as the general public was concerned, science fiction was a bunch of teenage boys reading pulp magazines, Godzilla, and The Creature from the Black Lagoon (which I actually liked and I really liked the creature). That, the B-movies and what non-readers of SF thought was in those pulps, was SciFi. Admittedly, their prejudices about the pulps were supported by some of the cover art.

This is what those of us who were cognoscenti (me, at nine) called BEM or Bemmi science fiction. (BEM: Bug Eyed Monster: the covers not infrequently showed one carrying off a pulchritudinous female with half her clothing ripped off. Why the alien would be interested was never explained. The covers did attract teenage boys.) Also admittedly, at the height, there were pulps aimed at teenage boys with stories to match those covers. And, Bemmi became one of those made-up future words used by characters in SF stories to refer, impolitely, to aliens in the story.

SF, on the other hand, was real (to one degree or another) science fiction. SF asked questions, the big one being "what if?". Real science fiction was expected to acknowledge known limits: faster than light travel needed to either be foregone, or given a plausible, if not reality-based, explanation. (Thus the ever popular wormhole.) There were some writers who stayed entirely in the solar system. (Many of their planets weren't too realistic base on what we now know.) Others tried to figure out how to make a generation ship work.

At any rate, SciFi was not "real" science fiction. Some in the field didn't even like "SF". They wanted to use Scientifiction, to emphasize the use of real science in the stories. That one never caught on, but it reflected the fact that many early authors had day jobs as industrial, academic, or military physicists, chemists, nuclear engineers, medical doctors, etc. Their "what if's" reflected questions current in their fields.

The battle was lost when SF moved out of the ghetto, into the mainstream. There were a combination of factors driving this. The space race was a big one. Star Trek was another. And, honestly, the Cold War and fear of nuclear Armageddon was probably a big driver, too. Recent authors, and by that I mean those who started writing in the 1970s and later, maybe even some from the sixties, are pretty uniformly fine with SciFi. It just still looks odd to me. (Defensive? Think Me? Eh? Not muchNot talking Whistle )
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 4:20:23 PM

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Sissus, ja saukon sukuelimet!

Or

Owlee mouses!


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 4:27:36 PM

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Ruth it reminds me of a talk I once attended at my local library by the late author Ian Banks.

As Ian Banks he wrote books such as the Crow Road and Canal Street that were well received here by the literary establishment, as Ian M Banks he wrote Science Fiction which they looked down upon.

His literary agent tried to persuade him that using the term speculative fiction for his science fiction books would garner him more respect, his reply was that it would not pay the bills though.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 5:48:45 PM

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RuthP wrote:
At any rate, SciFi was not "real" science fiction.


What irritated some people was the slanginess of the description. It was a take-off on the term "hi-fi" (for "high fidelity), which by the late 1960s sounded somewhat out of date. The joke ran that "sci-fi" should be pronounced "skiffy", to rhyme with "Skippy", a brand of American peanut butter, because it "sticks to the roof of your brain" (peanut butter is known for its quality of sticking to the roof of your mouth - that's why people give it to their dogs to control barking).

RuthP
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 6:26:06 PM

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Eoin Riedy wrote:
RuthP wrote:
At any rate, SciFi was not "real" science fiction.


What irritated some people was the slanginess of the description. It was a take-off on the term "hi-fi" (for "high fidelity), which by the late 1960s sounded somewhat out of date. The joke ran that "sci-fi" should be pronounced "skiffy", to rhyme with "Skippy", a brand of American peanut butter, because it "sticks to the roof of your brain" (peanut butter is known for its quality of sticking to the roof of your mouth - that's why people give it to their dogs to control barking).

Yep, except there was my ex, who was an English second-language speaker, for whom it was See-Fee.Dancing

Sure. Those in the field took science fiction seriously. They were not happy that the general public saw it as kid stuff. "Scientifiction", which was first proposed around the late `20s, I think, had an H.G. Wells-era feel, SciFi was the stuff of the (bad) movies, "SteF" (which was a Scientifiction derivative) never caught on. It was pretty much "SF" or nothing. But then popular culture got hold of us, and there you go.

The argument has, as far as I can see, been resolved for "SciFi", even if I don't use it.
RuthP
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 6:34:25 PM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
Ruth it reminds me of a talk I once attended at my local library by the late author Ian Banks.

As Ian Banks he wrote books such as the Crow Road and Canal Street that were well received here by the literary establishment, as Ian M Banks he wrote Science Fiction which they looked down upon.

His literary agent tried to persuade him that using the term speculative fiction for his science fiction books would garner him more respect, his reply was that it would not pay the bills though.

I love (M) Banks's "Culture" novels. I want to live in the culture. Either that, or go colonize Mars before I die. Think Whistle

Yes, and then there's Margaret Atwood, who declines to have her books called science fiction. There are still many out there who feel that if it is science fiction, it cannot be literature. From the author's point of view, being labeled as "science fiction" does reduce your potential market: there are people who will refuse to even consider any book so labeled. Then again, as Banks noted, if one is writing that kind of fiction, one wishes the audience to know.

Then again, there's Samuel R. Delaney, who definitely writes literature, who proudly calls his work science fiction.

"Speculative fiction" as a term, always seemed to me designed to include fantasy. Of course, one must consider that any and all fiction is fantasy: none of it is "true".
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 7:22:34 PM

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It's been written that nearly all obscenities (as distinct from plain insults) refer to religion, sex, or scatology. Minced oaths follow the same lines, so we have gosh, darn, drat, dang, gee, jeez, jeepers, heck, holy cow, and jeeminy Christmas; frick, phooey, feck, jerk, and mother love a duck; shoot, pooh and baloney.

I'm surprised no one mentioned Red Dwarf's "smeg".

I'm sure we could come up with a lot more.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 7:31:26 PM

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I never had a problem with Science Fiction, or Sci-Fi, and didn't give a bleg what the effete elites thought of it. H.G. Wells, Issac Asimov, Stan Lee and Jules Vern were princes to me at that time.

There were, of course, the BEM'S as RuthP says, but they weren't to be taken seriously (well, I did take the cover art rather seriously, but that's a different topic...ahem). Btw, Ruth, have you seen The Shape of Water? A woman meets The Creature From the Black Lagoon, has sex with him and they live happily ever after...underwater..Applause


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
RuthP
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 7:44:46 PM

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FounDit wrote:
I never had a problem with Science Fiction, or Sci-Fi, and didn't give a bleg what the effete elites thought of it. H.G. Wells, Issac Asimov, Stan Lee and Jules Vern were princes to me at that time.

There were, of course, the BEM'S as RuthP says, but they weren't to be taken seriously (well, I did take the cover art rather seriously, but that's a different topic...ahem). Btw, Ruth, have you seen The Shape of Water? A woman meets The Creature From the Black Lagoon, has sex with him and they live happily ever after...underwater..Applause

I remember the advertising for it. No, I haven't seen it. I'm really very bad at seeing movies when they first come out.

EDIT: And, Heinlein, Asimov and Clarke were probably the bit three for me, but I read everything I could get my hands on. As my father subscribed to Analog, and often bought Galaxy, there was always that.

My public library had a wall (upstairs, in the adults part of the library) that was all science fiction. When I was ten, my school teacher gave me a permission note (pretty sure my parents had to agree, but I wasn't aware of that part) that let me have an adult public library card. (This was a program in my town for advanced readers. Usually, adult cards were for those in high school--and older.) Wow! Not only could I access the science fiction, I was no longer limited to three books at a time. Heaven.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 8:37:09 PM

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Eoin Riedy wrote:
It's been written that nearly all obscenities (as distinct from plain insults) refer to religion, sex, or scatology. Minced oaths follow the same lines, so we have gosh, darn, drat, dang, gee, jeez, jeepers, heck, holy cow, and jeeminy Christmas; frick, phooey, feck, jerk, and mother love a duck; shoot, pooh and baloney.

I'm surprised no one mentioned Red Dwarf's "smeg".

I'm sure we could come up with a lot more.


Smeg is a diffcult one it's a shortened form of another word that's often regarded as taboo.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 9:17:32 PM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
Smeg is a diffcult one it's a shortened form of another word that's often regarded as taboo.

Good grief, it's a medical term! I guess some people never grow up. All together now, "Penis, vagina, testicles, ovaries, uterus, prostate, smegma, semen." Now we're going to keep reciting those words until no one in the class giggles.

(Really, it's not difficult because many minced oaths are variations on taboo words.)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 2:50:20 AM

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Amazing how these threads develop sometimes!

So frellin' freaky that only the truly froody can grok them. . . Whistle Whistle

Perhaps it's time to re-open these literature threads:
Science fiction stories - a list of 32 great stories
Ray Bradbury and the poetry of science fiction
Books That Changed Science Fiction And Fantasy Forever

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 5:46:31 AM

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Sarrriesfan wrote:
Eoin Riedy wrote:
It's been written that nearly all obscenities (as distinct from plain insults) refer to religion, sex, or scatology. Minced oaths follow the same lines, so we have gosh, darn, drat, dang, gee, jeez, jeepers, heck, holy cow, and jeeminy Christmas; frick, phooey, feck, jerk, and mother love a duck; shoot, pooh and baloney.

I'm surprised no one mentioned Red Dwarf's "smeg".

I'm sure we could come up with a lot more.


Smeg is a diffcult one it's a shortened form of another word that's often regarded as taboo.


I am sure I read or heard somewhere that smeg in Red Dwarf was just chosen as a nonsense word because they liked the sound. Apparently they didn't make the connection. Or to the fridge, which I find much more disturbing! Whistle
I don't know if its true, but it certainly sounds possible. You are trying to think of a nice fun obscenity and that sound comes to mind, so you write it and it becomes that thing in your mind. Then anybody else who makes the connection thinks you intended it and doesn't challenge it, so it gets used. It was pretty laddish anyway so nobody would think they had to challenge it as being inappropriate.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 4:54:32 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Amazing how these threads develop sometimes!



“What sane person could live in this world and not be crazy?”

- Ursula K. Le Guin


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 3:41:30 PM

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RuthP wrote:
I love (M) Banks's "Culture" novels. I want to live in the culture.

Oh yes!
The books tell of 'special people' - the ones who decide to go visiting other societies and who have adventures.

The 'normal' people of the Culture (from the hints and the odd passage describing 'normal' life) seem to have an ideal scene.
I don't know what you'd call the society - I suppose a bit of an Anarchy (in the good meaning which Americans would agree with) - what government there is leaves the public alone (except in very extreme circumstances).
Also a bit of a Democracy on a local scale - in cases in which there is more than one person wanting the responsibility of running an area, industry or city, they present their cases to the people.
The Culture is so rich in resources and technology that everyone has plenty, can live where they like and do the work they like (or not work). So a bit of a Welfare State.
However, anyone who wants luxuries (above the 'normal' high-class homes, any food they want, all the gadgets, tech, automation they want) can earn it by taking more responsibility and doing it well. So it's a bit of a meritocracy too.
But most people work because they enjoy creating products.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 4:34:20 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
RuthP wrote:
I love (M) Banks's "Culture" novels. I want to live in the culture.

Oh yes!
The books tell of 'special people' - the ones who decide to go visiting other societies and who have adventures.

The 'normal' people of the Culture (from the hints and the odd passage describing 'normal' life) seem to have an ideal scene.
I don't know what you'd call the society - I suppose a bit of an Anarchy (in the good meaning which Americans would agree with) - what government there is leaves the public alone (except in very extreme circumstances).
Also a bit of a Democracy on a local scale - in cases in which there is more than one person wanting the responsibility of running an area, industry or city, they present their cases to the people.
The Culture is so rich in resources and technology that everyone has plenty, can live where they like and do the work they like (or not work). So a bit of a Welfare State.
However, anyone who wants luxuries (above the 'normal' high-class homes, any food they want, all the gadgets, tech, automation they want) can earn it by taking more responsibility and doing it well. So it's a bit of a meritocracy too.
But most people work because they enjoy creating products.


Futurists often call that model of society as "Post-scarcity", the Next Generation era of Star Trek with it's abundant use of replicator technology is another example.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 5:09:06 PM

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Thanks Sarrriesfan!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 8:39:30 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Amazing how these threads develop sometimes!

So frellin' freaky that only the truly froody can grok them. . . Whistle Whistle

Perhaps it's time to re-open these literature threads:
Science fiction stories - a list of 32 great stories
Ray Bradbury and the poetry of science fiction
Books That Changed Science Fiction And Fantasy Forever

OK, I just did my bit to restart the first one.
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