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the grid Options
justina bandol
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 7:43:01 PM
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The grid is quiet this Sunday morning. The citizens do not live this far downtown. Too much power in the lattice. Some tried. They discovered their hair on the pillow upon waking, fingernails and teeth loose and swimming in their flesh. Never mind the impossible prospect of organizing complete sentences. So no one lives in the financial district anymore, no one lives too close to the humming municipal temples. The streets of Federal Plaza are deserted and there are no shadows for the clouds, which snare the light and stain every ray silver.

What exactly is the grid? Does the lattice suggest some electric gate (or fence)? But why downtown? Does the grid rather mean the city institutions (gathered downtown)? It is certainly symbolic, but I cannot really see the physical image.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 12:35:08 AM

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At first, I was thinking of the internet, but it seems to be just a description of the way American cities are built like grid, unlike the more 'naturally grown' layouts elsewhere.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 1:56:44 AM

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I wonder if it's talking about an electricity grid.



Strange affects such as hair falling out, fingernails and teeth loosening could be side affects of being too near the power generation systems of the vertical city in the book Justina is reading.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 6:17:08 AM
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Is it one of those dystopian-future books?

I only ask because often those kinds of books "tease" one by using terms that are used differently in the imagined future - to get our attention and pique the curiosity. In this kind of scenario the terms gradually (or sometimes quite suddenly!)become clear the further one reads on?
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 10:28:43 AM

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They discovered their hair on the pillow upon waking, fingernails and teeth loose and swimming in their flesh, sounds more like radiation poisoning to me.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 10:47:55 AM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:
Is it one of those dystopian-future books?

I only ask because often those kinds of books "tease" one by using terms that are used differently in the imagined future - to get our attention and pique the curiosity. In this kind of scenario the terms gradually (or sometimes quite suddenly!)become clear the further one reads on?


It's certainly speculative fiction, if not future dystopian.


I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
justina bandol
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 12:25:24 PM
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Location: Bucharest, Bucuresti, Romania
It is the same Intuitionist, a baffling mixture of lots of genres. I thought too the meaning would become clear further on, but it didn't happen (to me at least). My guess is that the grid is a renovated part of downtown, where the new city and business buildings form some kind of regular structure, which might be protected by an electric fence (?) - though no fence is ever mentioned anywhere else in the novel. Or it might be a symbolic fence - ie the inaccessibility / corruption / inefficiency of city institutions. But the description of those „strange affects” trespassing of the „lattice” is very graphic!

This is by far the hardest book I have ever translated.
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