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Is 'in colour' redundant? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 11:15:14 PM
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Please imagine a bamboo tree. It is green in colour and tall.

Is 'in colour' redundant?

Thanks.
palapaguy
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 11:32:28 PM

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Koh Elaine wrote:
Please imagine a bamboo tree. It is green in colour and tall.

Is 'in colour' redundant?

Thanks.

Not redundant. It adds imaginative value to the sentence. (Sorry, but not being a grammarian, that was the best word I could come up with.) Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 1:28:21 AM

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Hmmmm . . .Think Think

It doesn't add anything to the description for me.

"It's green and tall" says it all.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 1:57:16 AM

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Green also has the meaning of fresh, unripe growth and some bamboos have stems and foliage of different colours not all are green.
https://www.thefreedictionary.com/green
Quote:
a. Not mature or ripe: green tomatoes.
b. Not grown up;



Black Bamboo

Bamboos are also fast growing some species grow at up to 90 cm a day so a "green and tall" bamboo could refer to a bamboo plant that was new growth of any colour and was tall.
"Green in colour and tall" tells us that "green" is used as a description of colour.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
kaNNa
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 2:52:23 AM

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depends upon the context.

imagine the difference between the two sentences.
"The pillar is green and tall"
"The pillar is green in color and tall"
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 3:08:35 AM

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kaNNa wrote:
depends upon the context.

imagine the difference between the two sentences.
"The pillar is green and tall"
"The pillar is green in color and tall"

To me, the difference is two added words which don't add any meaning.

Why not say "green in colour and tall in height"? Think Whistle


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 5:12:09 AM
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With Drago here -

When would an English speaker ever say "I have a new car which is blue in colour?" or "I'll wear a dress that is yellow in colour"?

So if I were editing a piece which had "X in colour" I would whip out my trusty red pen and score it out. Would not find a redundancy "imaginative"!

Its simply not English idiomatic use. It is only learners who say it, usually.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 7:42:50 AM

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But you do see it in prose, literary writing.

Yes, if you are describing a car, giving facts, you would say it is blue.

But if you are waxing lyrical about a bamboo plant, it is fine to say it is green in colour, tall and lithe in stature.

It depends how much 'style' you want to add to how you say it.


Also, I think as part of a longer explanation it can be used even in factual speech.
Eg it wouldn't sound odd to hear someone say
We are looking for the thieves' getaway car. It is Mini Cooper, red in colour with white stripes and a white roof.

I know it is a bit unnecessary for the sentence in the OP, but I don't think it is fair to write it off completely as not being natural English. It seems fine to me, with the appropriate punctuation.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 11:01:00 AM

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It's not that it would never be used, but the answer to the original question - "Is 'in colour' redundant?" has to be "It doesn't add anything to the description."

"It's green" says just as much as "It's green in colour."
"In colour" is not required or necessary.

redundant adj
1. surplus to requirements; unnecessary

Collins Dictionary

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 12:53:43 PM
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Thar - yes, one might come across it in print - one comes across many things in prose no-one else would ever write: think Hopkins, Burns, Thomas! But I wouldn't confuse a learner by diverting into the realm of Creative Writing.

And in formal writing? I'd still red-pen it. The point of formal writing is to choose the clearest way of getting something across, in the most economical way. Redundancies are a waste of one's word-count.

And I'm afraid if I heard someone describing a getaway car as "red in colour", I WOULD find it odd. And would probably lecture the TV or radio or whatever on teaching it's spokespersons to speak correctly!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Thursday, December 6, 2018 6:43:17 AM
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Thanks, everybody.
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