The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

I see you awake early today.(both 'awake' and 'early' are adverbs) Options
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 1:39:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,967
Neurons: 11,044
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi Everyone!
Both 'awake' and 'early' are adverbs or only "early" in,

I see you awake early today.

If I need the adverb of "awake"(an adverb describing how I now see you", "the case of being woken up"), how do I get it?


If I have written "I see you're awake early today.", then the same meaning will be and "awake" is also an adjective, and "early" is an adverb.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 2:28:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,198
Neurons: 73,908
The verb is to awaken, or much more commonly, to wake up.

So, in the past tense:
I saw you wake up, early this morning.
I saw you awaken, early this morning.
I saw you eat breakfast, early this morning

That is what they did (while you were watching) and when you saw them do it.

I saw you asleep early this morning.
I saw you awake early this morning.

This is the state they were in. An adjective, not a verb. They were asleep or they were awake. That was the state they were in when you saw them.

'I see' meaning 'I have noticed' or, 'I understand this is true, please respond because that is unusual' is a completely different use of the verb 'to see that...'
I see that the price of oil has gone up.
I see that you were awake early this morning. Why was that?


Quote:
see
verb (UNDERSTAND)

B1 [ T ] to understand, know, or realize:

[ + (that) ] I see (that) the club is organizing a theatre trip next month.


So do you understand what your sentence means?
I saw you awake
That is the state you were in when I saw you.
early today.
That is the time I saw you. The two words together. 'Early' on its own would make no sense, unless the 'today' were implied.

But the present tense of 'I see' doesn't fit in with the past time 'early today'.


Whereas
I see you are awake early, today
It is early (before you would normally wake up). I notice that you are awake. I comment on that being unusual.
" I see that you are awake early, today"
Here 'early' and 'today' are separate.

I comment on something.
You are awake early.
Ie you have woken up at an earlier time than you normally wake up.
This is unusual, and today is an exception - which is why I am commenting on it.
I think you are pulling in parts of sentences from different sources, but they mean different things and are said in different situations.

Or
I see you awoke early, today.

That is the past tense of the action 'to awake' and the time it happened (early). And what makes it special (it happened today, but usually you sleep till much later).

I know this seems like a digression from your question, but it isn't. Your example sentence is not accurate, so I am just trying to show you that the pieces you put together to make it are completely different structures.
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 7:23:41 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,967
Neurons: 11,044
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
thar wrote:
The verb is to awaken, or much more commonly, to wake up.

So, in the past tense:
I saw you wake up, early this morning.
I saw you awaken, early this morning.
I saw you eat breakfast, early this morning

That is what they did (while you were watching) and when you saw them do it.

I saw you asleep early this morning.
I saw you awake early this morning.

This is the state they were in. An adjective, not a verb. They were asleep or they were awake. That was the state they were in when you saw them.


Thanks a lot,
Yes, I mean "That is what they did (while I was watching) and when them saw them do it.)

I saw you wake up, early this morning. (here 'wake up' is a verb, I need it an adverb)
I saw you awaken, early this morning.( 'awaken' is an adjective)
I saw you eat breakfast, early this morning ('eat' is a verb)

I translated Arabic sentence to English where in Arabic 'awake' and 'early' are parsed both adverbs modifying 'you', however, I don't find any word corresponding to 'awake' as an adverb.
I think 'asleep' and 'awake' cannot be found as an adverb.
BTW, I don't care about the tense here.
I see you awake early, today.
I see both of you awake early, today.
I am seeing both of you awake early, today.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 7:35:40 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,967
Neurons: 11,044
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen

Yes, I mean "That is what they did (while I was watching) and when them saw them do it.)


I saw you wake up, early this morning. (here 'wake up' is a verb, I need it an adverb)
I saw you awaken, early this morning.( 'awaken' is an adjective)
I saw you eat breakfast, early this morning ('eat' is a verb)

I want to know 'how did you see me?' So, I think the answer will be 'I saw you awake early, today.' where 'awake' and 'early' must be both 'adverbs.' which convey the answer of the question 'how did you see me'.

I translated Arabic sentence to English where in Arabic 'awake' and 'early' are parsed both adverbs modifying 'you', however, I don't find any word corresponding to 'awake' as an adverb.
I think 'asleep' and 'awake' cannot be found as an adverb.
BTW, I don't care about the tense here.
I see you awake early, today.
I see both of you awake early, today.
I am seeing both of you awake early, today.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, December 8, 2018 9:36:43 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 5,194
Neurons: 951,975
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
A cooperator wrote:
I saw you wake up, early this morning. (here 'wake up' is a verb, I need it an adverb)
I saw you awaken, early this morning.('awaken' is an adjective) No, 'awaken' is a verb. ('Awoken' is an adjective, i.e. the past participle of the verb 'to awake' when used transitively.).
I saw you eat breakfast, early this morning ('eat' is a verb)

I want to know 'how did you see me?' So, I think the answer will be 'I saw you awake early, today.' where 'awake' and 'early' must be both 'adverbs.' which convey the answer of the question 'how did you see me'.
'How did you see me?' here means "In what state was I when you saw me?" (to be answered with an adjective), not "In what manner did you see me?" or "By what method did you see me?" (both of which would be answered with an adverb). 'Awake' in "I saw you awake" describes 'you', not 'my seeing'.
A cooperator
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 5:20:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,967
Neurons: 11,044
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Audiendus wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
I saw you wake up, early this morning. (here 'wake up' is a verb, I need it an adverb)
I saw you awaken, early this morning.('awaken' is an adjective) No, 'awaken' is a verb. ('Awoken' is an adjective, i.e. the past participle of the verb 'to awake' when used transitively.).
I saw you eat breakfast, early this morning ('eat' is a verb)

I want to know 'how did you see me?' So, I think the answer will be 'I saw you awake early, today.' where 'awake' and 'early' must be both 'adverbs.' which convey the answer of the question 'how did you see me'.
'How did you see me?' here means "In what state was I when you saw me?" (to be answered with an adjective), not "In what manner did you see me?" or "By what method did you see me?" (both of which would be answered with an adverb). 'Awake' in "I saw you awake" describes 'you', not 'my seeing'.


Thanks a lot, Audiendus,
First of all, even in the equivalent translated Arabic sentence to 'I saw you awake early, today.', 'awake' describes how I saw 'you'. However, it is parsed as an adverb, and not 'adjective. However, 'He is early awake.' Here even in Arabic, 'awake' is parsed as an adjective describing 'He', and 'early' as an adverb.


In Arabic language, the highlighted words are parsed adverbs according to the movements on their ends.
John came laughingly. - How did john come? --> "laughingly". It is an adverb which is the answer of the question 'By what manner did John come?".
I saw the cat drinking - How did you see the cat? --> 'drinking'. It is A verbal phrase functioning as an adverb which is the answer of the question 'By what manner did you see the cat?".
The runner came back active.
The runner came back actively. - How did the runner come back? --> "Actively". It is an adverb which is the answer of the question 'By what manner did the runner come back?".
The same thing in "I saw you awake early, today.", "How did you see me?" - 'By what manner did you see me?' --> "it should be an adverb".
Yes, I am quite familiar with that 'awake' in "I saw you awake early, today." is an adjective describing 'you' and 'early' is an adverb describing 'my seeing for you'. But, I am looking for the derived adverb of 'awake' or the equivalent word in English used as an adverb answering the question "By what method did you see me today?" Can I say "I saw you awakenedly/awokenly/wokenly early, today." since I couldn't find an adverb.
In my Arabic language the corresponding words to both words 'awake' and 'early' are parsed as adverbs answering the question "In what manner did you see me?"
I don't know why the question in 'I saw you awake early, today.' cannot be 'In what manner did you see me?" whose answer is an adverb. However, in "The runner came back actively.", it's 'In what manner did the runner come back?' whose answer is an adverb 'actively'.
Is it because 'see' in English can be used with an adjective and adverbs. Or that adverbs and adjectives in English are dealt differently than they are dealt in Arabic.




Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Audiendus
Posted: Sunday, December 9, 2018 10:10:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 5,194
Neurons: 951,975
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
A cooperator wrote:
Yes, I am quite familiar with that 'awake' in "I saw you awake early, today." is an adjective describing 'you' and 'early' is an adverb describing 'my seeing for you'.

Yes, that is how it is dealt with in English. Please read the linked TFD article on object complements. It makes no mention of adverbs.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Object-Complements.htm

A cooperator wrote:
But, I am looking for the derived adverb of 'awake' or the equivalent word in English used as an adverb answering the question "By what method did you see me today?" Can I say "I saw you awakenedly/awokenly/wokenly early, today." since I couldn't find an adverb.

I do not know of any dictionary that lists such adverbs. From my point of view as a native English speaker, I do not think an adverb would be appropriate here. A person can 'see' in various ways: early, late, often, seldom, suddenly, gradually, well, badly, easily, clearly, dimly, indistinctly, fuzzily, fortunately, surprisingly, sadly, relievedly - but one cannot (in normal English) see awakenedly or awokenly. (If I came across the sentence "I saw you awakenedly/awokenly early today", I would assume it meant that 'I', not 'you', was in an awakened/awoken state.)

A cooperator wrote:
However, in "The runner came back actively.", it's 'In what manner did the runner come back?' whose answer is an adverb 'actively'.

Yes, but the adverb gives a different meaning from the adjective here. Consider the following:

1. The runner came back tiredly. [= he was tired while he was coming back; he came back slowly and wearily]
2. The runner came back tired. [= he was tired when he had come back; he may not have been tired while he was coming back; he may have come back quickly and energetically]

A cooperator wrote:
Is it because 'see' in English can be used with an adjective and adverbs. Or that adverbs and adjectives in English are dealt differently than they are dealt in Arabic.

It may be a difference between the two languages, yes.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.