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will quench Options
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 10:50:16 AM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
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Hi
Shouldn't it be 'would' instead of 'will'?
"Only Pepsi Cola will quench my thirst on such a hot day."
thar
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 10:58:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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It is a certain prediction of the future, not a conditional.

Only this key will open this door.

Only Pepsi Cola will quench my thirst.

(It is not something you would ever say, though, except in an advert!)
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 11:37:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
thar wrote:
It is a certain prediction of the future, not a conditional.

Only this key will open this door.

Only Pepsi Cola will quench my thirst.

(It is not something you would ever say, though, except in an advert!)

Thanks a lot thar
Why is it used in an advert?
thar
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 11:51:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Because nobody speaks like that in real life.

In real life they would say any number of things,
eg
I could kill a pepsi right now.
Or
I'm thirsty. I need a coke


What a person would not say, is
Only Pepsi Cola will quench my thirst.
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 12:58:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
thar wrote:
Because nobody speaks like that in real life.

In real life they would say any number of things,
eg
I could kill a pepsi right now.
Or
I'm thirsty. I need a coke


What a person would not say, is
Only Pepsi Cola will quench my thirst.

I understand. Thank you thar
Hust this question please, is the sentence below an advert too?
"Foam will quench an oil fire."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 1:08:58 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,685
Neurons: 182,345
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
That sounds more like a technical report - someone experimenting with different types of fire-extinguisher, then writing a report.

"Quench" is not a common word - rather formal.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 1:19:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
That sounds more like a technical report - someone experimenting with different types of fire-extinguisher, then writing a report.

"Quench" is not a common word - rather formal.

Thanks a lot Drago :)
thar
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 1:45:12 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,203
Neurons: 73,928
Also if a fire is burning, then you have to use a word to say it has stopped burning.

The simplest but not technical:
Foam will put out an oil fire

The slightly more technical but still common
Foam will extinguish an oil fire

The more literary and unusual, it seems to me
Foam will quench an oil fire

So the structure of the sentence invites the use of that sort of verb, even if 'quench' is a less common way to say it.

But you never talk about 'my thirst'.
Only in grand literary statements - "only the death of Sauron and the destruction of the Kingdom of Mordor will quench my thirst for revenge against those who have wronged me."
Or something like that.
If you are thirsty, you say you need a drink, or you say you are thirsty. It would be very formal and literary to talk about your thirst in such a commonplace context.
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 4:13:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 479
Neurons: 2,199
thar wrote:
Also if a fire is burning, then you have to use a word to say it has stopped burning.

The simplest but not technical:
Foam will put out an oil fire

The slightly more technical but still common
Foam will extinguish an oil fire

The more literary and unusual, it seems to me
Foam will quench an oil fire

So the structure of the sentence invites the use of that sort of verb, even if 'quench' is a less common way to say it.

But you never talk about 'my thirst'.
Only in grand literary statements - "only the death of Sauron and the destruction of the Kingdom of Mordor will quench my thirst for revenge against those who have wronged me."
Or something like that.
If you are thirsty, you say you need a drink, or you say you are thirsty. It would be very formal and literary to talk about your thirst in such a commonplace context.

It's very helpful. Thank you :)
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