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Is "of which" correctly used? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, November 5, 2018 12:41:15 AM
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The plane for this particular flight is the new Airbus 350-900ULR (ultra-long-range) aircraft, of which SIA is the first carrier to use.

Is "of which" correctly used?

Thanks.
josvrancken
Posted: Monday, November 5, 2018 7:02:47 AM

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I'm not a native speaker, but I would say: ", of which the carrier SIA is the first user." or ", of which SIA is the first carrier to use it".
But the example sentence is wrong, I guess. As usual with English, it's hard to be sure.
FounDit
Posted: Monday, November 5, 2018 10:40:03 AM

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Koh Elaine wrote:
The plane for this particular flight is the new Airbus 350-900ULR (ultra-long-range) aircraft, of which SIA is the first carrier to use.

Is "of which" correctly used?

Thanks.


It looks right to me. "Of which" refers to the ultra-long-range aircraft. I agree with josvrancken that it could be worded a bit better. I would have said, "... aircraft, and SIA is the first carrier to use one."


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
NKM
Posted: Monday, November 5, 2018 12:25:31 PM

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It doesn't look right to me. The word "of" is extraneous.

The plane for this particular flight is the new Airbus 350-900ULR (ultra-long-range) aircraft, which SIA is the first carrier to use.

Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, November 5, 2018 12:30:37 PM
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Joined: 7/4/2012
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Thanks to all of you.
thar
Posted: Monday, November 5, 2018 5:11:42 PM

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I know I am a bit late, but I am with NKM.

You should be able to recreate the sentence that the clause replaces.

'which' refers to the last noun - the plane.

So the sentence replaced by 'of which' would be

SIA is the first carrier to use of the plane.

Which is not right.

You can have
The carrier SIA is the first user of the plane.
...of which the carrier SIA is the first user.

or
SIA is the first carrier to make use of the plane
(which I don't like, but it does use 'of')
... of which SIA is the first carrier to make use.
(ugh, that is horrible - I think because you are splitting a phrasal verb wrongly)

But if you start with the sentence:
SIA is the first carrier to use the plane.
then you replace 'the plane' with 'which', creating the clause:
.... which SIA is the first carrier to use.

Or, as has been suggested, rewrite the whole thing.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 7:51:17 AM
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Agree the "of" is misused here.

But also wondering how this post ended up on the "Literature" forum?
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