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QP
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 10:27:02 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/28/2015
Posts: 443
Neurons: 6,956
Hi friends,

Two women are quarrelling as follows:-

A: Everyone said you are interesting in my boyfriend.
B: No.
A: You said "he is good look guy" at the club on that night.
B: Yeah, but...
A: When I came in the club, you said "A is coming. I can look, but I cannot touch"
B: I am see Mike (he is another man, not A's boyfriend).
A: I don't take that as anything.
B: I'm not having this, sorry.

Does the sentence in bold mean "I don't take that as an excuse?

Thank you
QP
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 10:54:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,725
Neurons: 51,343
QP wrote:
Hi friends,

Two women are quarrelling as follows:-

A: Everyone said you are interesting in my boyfriend.
B: No.
A: You said "he is good look guy" at the club on that night.
B: Yeah, but...
A: When I came in the club, you said "A is coming. I can look, but I cannot touch"
B: I am see Mike (he is another man, not A's boyfriend).
A: I don't take that as anything.
B: I'm not having this, sorry.

Does the sentence in bold mean "I don't take that as an excuse?

Thank you
QP


Yes. Seeing Mike doesn't change anything.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Romany
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 11:59:45 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,541
Neurons: 45,412
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

This text is not written in "real" English - it's obviously written by a learner of English.

While native speakers would see what is meant by "I don't take that as anything" it's not a valid English sentence in this context.What a native speaker would probably say here (the context shows they are young clubbers i.e. 'cool'.) would probably be "So what?"

"Everyone says you're interested in my boyfriend."
"Well I'm not."
"You said he was a 'good looking guy' "
"Yeah, but..."
"When I came in you said:"I'm going to look, but I won't touch."
"Oh look, there's Mike!"
"So what?"
"I'm not having any more of this, sorry."

Most important: We don't use uncontracted forms in normal speech - especially if we're young people! No "you are"s, or "...is coming"or "I am"s. The moment someone writes speech like that it becomes obvious it's not a native speaker writing, and starts to sound "foreign" to us.

I hope this helps in your English writing?


QP
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 5:52:26 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/28/2015
Posts: 443
Neurons: 6,956
Thanks for all. I got it.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 8:01:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,088
Neurons: 6,942
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:

This text is not written in "real" English - it's obviously written by a learner of English.

While native speakers would see what is meant by "I don't take that as anything" it's not a valid English sentence in this context.What a native speaker would probably say here (the context shows they are young clubbers i.e. 'cool'.) would probably be "So what?"

"Everyone says you're interested in my boyfriend."
"Well I'm not."
"You said he was a 'good looking guy' "
"Yeah, but..."
"When I came in you said:"I'm going to look, but I won't touch."
"Oh look, there's Mike!"
"So what?"
"I'm not having any more of this, sorry."

Most important: We don't use uncontracted forms in normal speech - especially if we're young people! No "you are"s, or "...is coming"or "I am"s. The moment someone writes speech like that it becomes obvious it's not a native speaker writing, and starts to sound "foreign" to us.

I hope this helps in your English writing?




I can see why you have replaced 'I am see Mike!" With "Oh look, there's Mike!".

But could the original have been "I am seeing Mike!" meaning that B was in a relationship with Mike rather than B and A just observing him.
This makes more sense to me in the context as FounDit suggests B being in a relationship with Mike makes no difference to A. B has still been making overtures towards her boyfriend as A sees it.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 9:12:07 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,541
Neurons: 45,412
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Indeed it could, Sarries.

Unfortunately the English used in the text isn't very clear in one or two places, so it's a little difficult to try to interpret. You may be right. In which case the response would probably be something like "I don't believe you." "I bet that wouldn't stop you." "That doesn't convince me." "That means nothing to me." "That doesn't change anything.", then, I suppose?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 11:27:24 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,088
Neurons: 6,942
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:

Indeed it could, Sarries.

Unfortunately the English used in the text isn't very clear in one or two places, so it's a little difficult to try to interpret. You may be right. In which case the response would probably be something like "I don't believe you." "I bet that wouldn't stop you." "That doesn't convince me." "That means nothing to me." "That doesn't change anything.", then, I suppose?


It's the reason I have been trying to get Qp to tell us the source of these extracts, so we can go to the source and see the wider context for ourselves.

It will help us interpret what's happening.

I agree the response could be one of those you have described and one would probably be what I would write if it were me, but I have heard some very strange uses of English amongst younger people that mangle grammar these days and the Author may be reflecting that

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 7, 2018 5:44:14 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,541
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Yes, further context would help a lot in these queries.

But, judging by the level of the English used in these quoted texts I assumed that QP was making these conversations up to see if the idiomatic usages were correct? i
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 7, 2018 5:44:14 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,541
Neurons: 45,412
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Yes, further context would help a lot in these queries.

But, judging by the level of the English used in these quoted texts I assumed that QP was making these conversations up to see if the idiomatic usages were correct? i
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, November 7, 2018 6:07:36 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,088
Neurons: 6,942
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:

Yes, further context would help a lot in these queries.

But, judging by the level of the English used in these quoted texts I assumed that QP was making these conversations up to see if the idiomatic usages were correct? i


That's possible I had taken a different view that they were taken from a particular work of fiction and reflects a particular pattern of speech used in that work.

Qp is asking us to explain a sentence or on other threads to understand a phrase rather than to check their own usage.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 7, 2018 6:13:37 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,541
Neurons: 45,412
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Hmmm. Well I don't think that a printed work of fiction would use "...interesting in my boyfriend." or "...he is a good-look guy" "I am see Mike" etc.though? QP should ask for the money back if it is!!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, November 7, 2018 8:28:47 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,088
Neurons: 6,942
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Romany wrote:

Hmmm. Well I don't think that a printed work of fiction would use "...interesting in my boyfriend." or "...he is a good-look guy" "I am see Mike" etc.though? QP should ask for the money back if it is!!


Unless the author is using it in direct speech to reflect the speech patterns of his characters, something that Irving Welsh did in "Tainspotting" and in "A Clockwork Orange" Anthony Burgess invented his own slang.

But I wonder if these are extracts from the script of a film or television program, something like "Kidulthood" or " Attack The Block" that use street language.

But that's why I would like to know the nature of these pieces of writing something Qp has made up themselves, fiction that has been badly transcribed or fiction that reflects a particular vernacular.

If it is the last of these we can then explain to Qp that the English used in them may not be the best version to learn.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
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