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Is 'one' necessary? Options
Palinkasocsi
Posted: Saturday, November 3, 2018 8:29:55 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2011
Posts: 668
Neurons: 3,463
Dear Friends,

Could anyone please help me with this:

How do you think the following sentence should end:

1. but which is analytic
2. but is analytic
3. but analytic?

This essay shows a new orientation in the research – one which is not theory-driven or definition-centred but which is analytic in nature.

Thank you!

Pal
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, November 3, 2018 10:16:07 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,723
Neurons: 51,335
Palinkasocsi wrote:
Dear Friends,

Could anyone please help me with this:

How do you think the following sentence should end:

1. but which is analytic
2. but is analytic
3. but analytic?

This essay shows a new orientation in the research – one which is not theory-driven or definition-centred but which is analytic in nature.

Thank you!

Pal


All of them work, but 3) seems a bit too brief. I would vote for either 1) or 2) with the first as the one I like the best (though "analytical" sounds better to me, but that's a personal choice).

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 4:08:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,401
Neurons: 179,177
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!
I'm use British English generally, as opposed to FounDit's American English.

In this case, I am in total agreement.
(c) sounds 'clipped short'.
Your sentence is formal, so keeping the "which" sounds right.

To answer the question in the thread title, the "one" is not needed:
". . . one which is not theory-driven or definition-centred but one which is analytical in nature." sounds too much to me.

You'll see that I also like 'analytical' in this sentence.

There are some phrases in which I'd use 'analytic', but not this one.
I've had a brief look, but can't see a pattern.
It may just be 'common collocations' which I copy. I use 'analytical' commonly, but I use 'analytic' in specific defined cases.

An analytical mind. (normal natural phrase for me)
An analytic language. (This is a strictly defined type of language, in linguistics)
Analytical language. (This is the way someone speaks - in a logical manner)
An analytic statement. (This has a very specific meaning in the subject of logic - it's a statement for which the opposite is impossible. "All husbands are married" is analytic - "an unmarried husband" is impossible.)
An analytical statement. (This is just a logical sentence. "I'm hungry, so I think I'll eat" - pretty logical.)


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Palinkasocsi
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 4:40:03 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2011
Posts: 668
Neurons: 3,463
Thank you!

Pal
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