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Forward of this point Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Saturday, October 13, 2018 3:32:47 AM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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I saw the following notice on the bus:
No standing passengers forward of this point.
What is the grammatical form and function of "forward" here?
sureshot
Posted: Saturday, October 13, 2018 11:10:21 AM
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Joined: 9/16/2015
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Jigneshbharati wrote:
I saw the following notice on the bus:
No standing passengers forward of this point.
What is the grammatical form and function of "forward" here?

_____________

Answering your specific query,I would like to say that "forward" is an adverb of place. It answers the question word "where".

The given sentence is like a Notice. So the verb is missing.The complete sentence using the adverb "forward" is:

- No standing passengers are permitted forward of this point.

This sentence conveys the sense, but it can be improved. The sentence should be:

- No standing passengers are permitted beyond this point.

If you want it as a Notice, you might like to say:

- No standing passengers beyond this point.
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Saturday, October 13, 2018 12:33:00 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 1,887
Neurons: 10,737
Thanks. Do we always exclude verbs in notices?
sureshot
Posted: Saturday, October 13, 2018 12:40:26 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,022
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Jigneshbharati wrote:
Thanks. Do we always exclude verbs in notices?

______________

No. Headings of Articles, Notices etc are sometimes written without verbs. You will see several examples in a newspaper.
thar
Posted: Saturday, October 13, 2018 1:34:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,177
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You can't have 'beyond this point' because you have just come in through the door and past the driver. Then, when you are in the bus, the sign says you can't stand next to the driver. So 'beyond' doesn't work because that is where you have just come from.
The use of 'forward' is from the view of inside the bus facing forwards.


'Beyond' works if nobody is allowed in that area:




However, it would feel a bit silly on a bus when you have just come from beyond that point.

You enter the bus, pay the driver or swipe a card, then move down inside. Then, as you look forwards, the sign says you can't stand too far forward because that would distract the driver.









You can't say 'beyond' because you have just come from there. You can't say 'in front of' because that is ambiguous - when you are facing the sign to read it you are standing in front of it. The answer they have come up with is 'forward of'.

Which works because there is a forward in a bus which means 'closer to the front of the bus'.

Unless it is reversing. Whistle

It is peculiar, clumsy-feeling grammar because it is one particular situation, and has to have its own special solution. This need is not something that commonly arises, apart from in public transport.

You would never see this particular phrasing anywhere else.

ozok
Posted: Saturday, October 13, 2018 2:03:50 PM
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Joined: 7/24/2018
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just sayin'
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