The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

more than or the most than Options
Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 8:53:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/21/2015
Posts: 124
Neurons: 3,600
There is a group of 5 people. And Jack is one of its members. (What sounds correct?) He has the most money than the others. or He has more money than the others.

I think the version with "the most" is better because we have more than two people, but is this rule strictly observed in real daily speaking?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 9:31:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,636
Neurons: 181,638
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Ivan.

There are two uses of "more", "most" and "the most" - they can be adverbs modifying adjectives; or they can be adjectives modifying nouns.
He is more friendly than his brother. (adverb modifying 'friendly')
He has more money that his brother. (adjective modifying 'money')

Your sentence is the adjective modifying 'money'.

***********************
"More + <noun>" can be used when there is one 'other' or many. It is comparative.

He has more money than his brother. (one other person)
He has more money that any other person in the world. (7.6 Billion other people)

"The most" is usually used in cases where there are several 'others' (it is usually worded differently when there is only one 'other')
"He has the most money of the group" or "He, of the group, has the most money." or "He has more money than any of the others."
"He has the most money of the two of them" - but this would normally be said "He has more money than _______."

"most" is usually used when the "others" are not mentioned (but are understood - both the speaker and the recipient know what they mean). It can be used for one 'other' or many.
"John has most money." (Everyone involved knows that you mean "He has the most money of his brother and himself.")
"John has most money." (Everyone involved knows that you mean "He has the most money of all the people in the room.")

**************
I would say "He has more money than any of the other members" is the sentence you need.

I think that you are thinking of the rule used when 'more' and 'most' are adverbs.
He is the more wealthy of the two people.
He is the most wealthy of the five people.

That is a very different situation.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 9:31:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,168
Neurons: 73,804
No, because it is not about the numbers. It is a comparative (more than) not a superlative (most).

He has more money than the others.

He has the most money, out of the whole group.

You can be more than one other (if there are two of you), or more than a million others.

You can be the most of three or anything above that.

The two structures are different.

More than....
less than....
older than....
younger than.....

the most
the least
the oldest
the youngest

edit.
As you said.
I didn't think of the other structure, because it is not as common
has has the more money of [the two]
he as the most money of [all of them]
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 11:46:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,636
Neurons: 181,638
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
thar wrote:
I didn't think of the other structure, because it is not as common.

Yes - it was only the comment "I think the version with "the most" is better because we have more than two people" which made me look at that rule ('the more + <adjective>' when comparing two, and 'the most + <adjective>' when comparing several).
Then I realised that rule was nothing to do with this sentence.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.