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'prepared for' Vs. 'provisioned for' (verbs) Options
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 8:24:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,957
Neurons: 11,014
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi Everyone!


While trying to add a Google account on my Android device, Wireless Local Area Network(WLAN) was turned OFF, but Wi-Fi network(Wireless Router) was ON, I've been faced with this message error below.

Couldn't sign in!
You don't have a network connection. This could be a temporary problem or your Android device may not be provisioned for data services. Try again when connected to a mobile network, or connect to a Wi-Fi network.

My questions needed to be covered by you are as follows:

What does 'provision' mean here? Is it a synonym for 'prepare'?
Is it a passivised verb or adjective there?
Is the 'for' preposition needed to be paired with either verb?


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 10:55:34 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,897
Neurons: 51,943
A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!


While trying to add a Google account on my Android device, Wireless Local Area Network(WLAN) was turned OFF, but Wi-Fi network(Wireless Router) was ON, I've been faced with this message error below.

Couldn't sign in!
You don't have a network connection. This could be a temporary problem or your Android device may not be provisioned for data services. Try again when connected to a mobile network, or connect to a Wi-Fi network.

My questions needed to be covered by you are as follows:

What does 'provision' mean here? Is it a synonym for 'prepare'?
"Supplied" would be closer to the correct synonym. Your phone may not be supplied with what is needed for receiving data. That is probably not true, just that you had no connection temporarily.

Is it a passivised verb or adjective there?
It appears to be an active verb to me.

Is the 'for' preposition needed to be paired with either verb?
Paired with provisioned, the word "for" shows the purpose of the provision/supplied item. The provision is for the purpose of data.



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, October 9, 2018 8:23:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,957
Neurons: 11,014
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
FounDit wrote:
Quote:

Is it a passivised verb or adjective there?
It appears to be an active verb to me.

Is the 'for' preposition needed to be paired with either verb?
Paired with provisioned, the word "for" shows the purpose of the provision/supplied item. The provision is for the purpose of data.



Thank you a lot, FundDit,
Having said 'Provisioned or your suggested alternative 'supplied' is a passivised verb, I mean the sentence having a bare passive-infinitive which is "be provisioned/be supplied"

Secondly: then a 'provisioned for' and 'supplied with' are not phrasal verbs since they are followed by prepositions.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, October 11, 2018 3:18:47 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,670
Neurons: 182,147
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello A Cooperator.

I think you're right.
The clause "your Android device may not be provisioned for data services" has a complex verb-form "may not be provisioned for" (which I would write "may not be provided with" - I don't understand why the author invented his/her own grammar here).

It can be looked at as the passive form of "(the maker) may not have provided your Android device with . . ."
"Prepared for" is very similar - and communicates the same idea.
(It could also be looked at as a linking-verb sentence, with 'provisioned for data services' as an adjectival phase.)

All the suggested verbs are used with a preposition:
provisioned for
prepared for
provided with
supplied with.

This is the same form as many phrasal verbs but they are not phrasal verbs because they do not have an idiomatic meaning (the meaning is obvious from the meaning of the two words used).

EDITED to change my wording of the second paragraph and add a second possible analysis.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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