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Idiom Options
D00M
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 2:03:11 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
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Hello respected teachers,

Is there an idiom to say that something is frightening at first but soon you realize it's easy?

For example, a book whose first few pages scares you off but moving on you realize it's very easy.

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
sureshot
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 1:31:38 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
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D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

Is there an idiom to say that something is frightening at first but soon you realize it's easy?

For example, a book whose first few pages scares you off but moving on you realize it's very easy.



__________________________

Your query has gone unanswered. Let me make a start and hopefully this will lead to more constructive suggestions.

It appears to me that there is no standard idiom that conveys the desired feeling you are talking about. Interestingly, the opposite sense is conveyed by some as "deceptively simple". Somehow, the expression "deceptively difficult" does not find much favour and the use of alternatives is often suggested .

So, I guess, it is safer to use alternate phrases/expressions that convey your intended sense.
D00M
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 4:43:26 AM

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Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,607
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Thank you so much.

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 5:44:21 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
You can always use the phrase get the wind up in this context. Or take fright at.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
sureshot
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 6:15:44 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
You can always use the phrase get the wind up in this context. Or take fright at.

____________________

The expression "get the wind up" means "to become nervous or frightened" as in "When the boxer saw his opponent he got the wind up". In this expression, the last emotional state is one of fright.

The phrase "take fright at" means "to be suddenly frightened by something and want to get away from it". Here too, the last stage is one of fright as in "My dog took fright at the noise of the fireworks and hid under the bed".

In DOOM's query, the last stage is of finding the situation easy. So, I wonder if the above expressions meet DOOM's requirement.

The suggested idioms do not appear to aptly conveys the intended sequence of emotions. Perhaps, there is a need to put on one's thinking cap yet again!

The idiom should convey the sense that the event ends with finding the situation/problem finally easy. I am unable to think of a suitable idiom that aptly meets this requirement.

Maybe, some more responses may help.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 8:31:25 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I can't think of any idiom.

One could add "briefly" to JJ's suggestions, but then I would expect "but . . .", which makes a whole sentence rather than an idiom.

He briefly took fright at the size of the book, but realised his mistake.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Ursus Minor
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 9:03:52 AM

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Location: Inozemtsevo, Stavropol'skiy, Russia
You could convey the idea with a phrase like 'the devil proved to be not so black'.
sureshot
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 10:26:56 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,024
Neurons: 379,421

Ursus Minor wrote:
You could convey the idea with a phrase like 'the devil proved to be not so black'.


___________________


Since here is no other better alternative, I guess this idiom could do. Its complete form is:

- The devil is not so black as he is painted.
D00M
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 2:46:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,607
Neurons: 7,645
Thank you very much all.

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
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