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Carmenex
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 8:50:54 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,014
Neurons: 5,349
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I will strive to keep my commitments, and to deliver on work. If, for any reason, I will not manage to do it, I will be honest about it (it is clear what "it" is referred to?) with these colleagues, and, therefore, I will follow up with the anyone who can be affected.
renee talley 1
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 9:46:42 AM
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FounDit
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 11:12:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,831
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Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
There are a few issues with your word choices, in my opinion.
The first is the idea of striving to "deliver on" work. I suggest changing this to striving to "deliver on my work responsibilities".

Secondly, saying, "I will not manage to do it" creates the idea that you may choose not to honor your responsibility. I think a better choice of words would be "If, for any reason, I am unable to complete my assigned tasks".

And lastly, I think "follow up" should be reworded.

These changes would then read as:
"I will strive to keep my commitments, and to deliver on my work responsibilities. If, for any reason, I am unable to complete my assigned tasks, I will quickly inform any of my colleagues who may be affected".

I will strive to keep my commitments, and to deliver on work. If, for any reason, I will not manage to do it, I will be honest about it (it is clear what "it" is referred to?) with these colleagues, and, therefore, I will follow up with the anyone who can be affected.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 4:17:00 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,014
Neurons: 5,349
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
There are a few issues with your word choices, in my opinion.
The first is the idea of striving to "deliver on" work. I suggest changing this to striving to "deliver on my work responsibilities".

Secondly, saying, "I will not manage to do it" creates the idea that you may choose not to honor your responsibility. I think a better choice of words would be "If, for any reason, I am unable to complete my assigned tasks".

And lastly, I think "follow up" should be reworded.

These changes would then read as:
"I will strive to keep my commitments, and to deliver on my work responsibilities. If, for any reason, I am unable to complete my assigned tasks, I will quickly inform any of my colleagues who may be affected".

I will strive to keep my commitments, and to deliver on work. If, for any reason, I will not manage to do it, I will be honest about it (it is clear what "it" is referred to?) with these colleagues, and, therefore, I will follow up with the anyone who can be affected.


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your advice. And, would you suggest not using I will not manage to do it because will can mean want to, or for another reason?
If you use ... unable to ..., should it not be If, for any reason, I will be unable to ...?
Why is follow up not appropriate?
FounDit
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 6:04:31 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,831
Neurons: 51,747
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
There are a few issues with your word choices, in my opinion.
The first is the idea of striving to "deliver on" work. I suggest changing this to striving to "deliver on my work responsibilities".

Secondly, saying, "I will not manage to do it" creates the idea that you may choose not to honor your responsibility. I think a better choice of words would be "If, for any reason, I am unable to complete my assigned tasks".

And lastly, I think "follow up" should be reworded.

These changes would then read as:
"I will strive to keep my commitments, and to deliver on my work responsibilities. If, for any reason, I am unable to complete my assigned tasks, I will quickly inform any of my colleagues who may be affected".

I will strive to keep my commitments, and to deliver on work. If, for any reason, I will not manage to do it, I will be honest about it (it is clear what "it" is referred to?) with these colleagues, and, therefore, I will follow up with the anyone who can be affected.


Hi FounDit, and thank you for your advice. And, would you suggest not using I will not manage to do it because will can mean want to, or for another reason?
When it comes to work, or doing your job, "will" isn't the same as "want to". When you use " I will", most often you are saying you will actively make an effort; you put forth force to accomplish, or do. Saying "I will not" implies exerting a force against accomplishing, or doing. The force comes from inside you; you refuse.

Saying, "I will not manage to do it" creates the idea that you refuse to do it. What you want to convey is the idea that something will prevent you, or hinder you. For that reason, I suggested, "I will be unable to manage (or complete)..." Using "unable" suggests some condition acting against you.

If you use ... unable to ..., should it not be If, for any reason, I will be unable to ...?
No, in this you want to show that there is some reason why you cannot perform; a reason that works against you. Using "I will be unable to..." could convey the idea you do not have the power within yourself to do.

Why is follow up not appropriate?

"Follow up" would work if the idea is that your colleagues communicate with you and you respond; you "follow up". But in the case where they depend on you to complete your work, and you are not able to do so, you don't want to wait until they contact you. You want to notify them in advance.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Wednesday, October 31, 2018 3:29:16 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,014
Neurons: 5,349
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the collocation of please is correct in any (or each?) of the following sentences:
I would like to please ask you the following questions: ...
I would like please to ask you the following questions: ...
I would please like to ask you the following questions: ...
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, November 1, 2018 12:09:54 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,831
Neurons: 51,747
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the collocation of please is correct in any (or each?) of the following sentences:
In ordinary speech, all might be said, but I think the second one is likely the most correct form. In essence, it says, "I would like, please (if you would kindly permit me), to ask you the following questions: ...

Another very common way might be: "May I please ask you the following questions:...

I would like to please ask you the following questions: ...
I would like please to ask you the following questions: ...
I would please like to ask you the following questions: ...


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Friday, November 2, 2018 10:33:05 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,014
Neurons: 5,349
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the collocation of please is correct in any (or each?) of the following sentences:
In ordinary speech, all might be said, but I think the second one is likely the most correct form. In essence, it says, "I would like, please (if you would kindly permit me), to ask you the following questions: ...

Another very common way might be: "May I please ask you the following questions:...

I would like to please ask you the following questions: ...
I would like please to ask you the following questions: ...
I would please like to ask you the following questions: ...


Thank you, FounDit, for the explanation. And, what follows the colon should not be capitalized and the questions should be separated by a semicolon, should it?
Would you use any, each or all in: I would please ask you if the collocation of please is correct in any, each or all of the following sentences: ...?
FounDit
Posted: Friday, November 2, 2018 11:50:33 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,831
Neurons: 51,747
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the collocation of please is correct in any (or each?) of the following sentences:
In ordinary speech, all might be said, but I think the second one is likely the most correct form. In essence, it says, "I would like, please (if you would kindly permit me), to ask you the following questions: ...

Another very common way might be: "May I please ask you the following questions:...

I would like to please ask you the following questions: ...
I would like please to ask you the following questions: ...
I would please like to ask you the following questions: ...


Thank you, FounDit, for the explanation. And, what follows the colon should not be capitalized and the questions should be separated by a semicolon, should it?
That would likely depend on which style guide you choose to use. The APA format is the one I'm most familiar with, but listings in that format are usually numbered, lettered, or bulleted. Again, it is your choice which guide to follow, or which has been chosen for you.

Would you use any, each or all in: I would please ask you if the collocation of please is correct in any, each or all of the following sentences: ...?

I would use "any" if I had some doubts about them. My reader then could give me feedback on which one they think works best.

However, if I felt fairly confident about all of them, I might use "each" or "all" just to get confirmation. But all three of them work for a question like this. One isn't necessarily better than another.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Friday, November 16, 2018 10:03:19 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,014
Neurons: 5,349
Hi FounDit, I would like please to ask you which of the options in bold is preferable (and, if you would suggest any changes):
This commitment [to innovation] is exemplified by the high-reliability,/and custom-engineered nuclear components and systems developed by X Inc., resulting/(which has resulted) in the company being a leading industrial partner in the Y Research Centre.
Carmenex
Posted: Friday, November 23, 2018 2:06:45 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,014
Neurons: 5,349
Hi FounDit, I would like please to ask you which of the options in bold is preferable (and, if you would suggest any changes):
This commitment [to innovation] is exemplified by the high-reliability,/and custom-engineered nuclear components and systems developed by X Inc., resulting/(which has resulted) in the company being a leading industrial partner in the Y Research Centre.
FounDit
Posted: Friday, November 23, 2018 7:53:10 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,831
Neurons: 51,747
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would like please to ask you which of the options in bold is preferable (and, if you would suggest any changes):
I suggest this version.

This commitment [to innovation] is exemplified by the highly reliable, custom-engineered nuclear components and systems developed by X Inc., which has resulted in the company being a leading industrial partner in the Y Research Centre.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, November 24, 2018 2:40:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,636
Neurons: 181,638
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I would like to add something - not from a "grammatical" viewpoint, really (though 'word choice' is a part of grammar) but more 'social'.

Firstly - the phrasing of your request is extremely polite - there's absolutely nothing wrong with any of the three possibilities you give (though I might add commas around 'please' sometimes).
They all use three "politeness factors" (a term I have just invented):
"Please"
The indirect question
The modal "I would like to" rather than the direct "May I"

This is even more than an average British person (polite as they may be) is likely to use. I would expect only two in a formal request like this one.

Please may I ask you which of the options in bold is preferable: ('Please' and indirect question)
I would like to ask you which of the options in bold is preferable: (Indirect question and 'would')
Which of the options in bold would you find preferable, please: ('Please' and 'would')

************
I agree with what you have both said about "will" and "will not".
"Will" is perfectly clear as a common way of expressing the future.
I'll be going to Moscow tomorrow. It will (It'll) rain later.
However, "will not" has implications of "refuse to" when used in the first person.
I will not go to Moscow. I won't go to Moscow.
(This doesn't really apply for impersonal sentences - "It won't rain later" is OK)

My first idea was to simply replace "I will strive to keep my commitments, and to deliver on work. If, for any reason, I will not . . ." with "I will strive to keep my commitments, and to deliver on work. If, for any reason, I don't . . ."
However, I think that FounDit's "don't manage to do it" is much better.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Carmenex
Posted: Saturday, November 24, 2018 2:22:20 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,014
Neurons: 5,349
Hi FounDit and Drag0nspeaker, and thank you for your helpful suggestions.
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