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This is vs it's vs i'm Options
Igor_
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 1:54:43 PM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Hi,
How can I introduce myself when I text to someone:
1) who doesn't know me
2) who knows me, but he hasn't got my number
3) I have met during a meeting and then I send a sms/email/ WhatsApp?


Is there any difference between "This is vs it's vs I'm"?
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 4:22:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Posts: 9,540
Neurons: 50,645
Igor_ wrote:
Hi,
How can I introduce myself when I text to someone:
There can be several methods, but the most common, I suppose, might be:

1) who doesn't know me (Hello/Hi, my name is, or Hi/Hello, I'm (name))
2) who knows me, but he hasn't got my number (Hi/Hello, It's (name)
3) I have met during a meeting and then I send a sms/email/ WhatsApp? (Hi/Hello, This is (name). We met during the meeting...)


Is there any difference between "This is vs it's vs I'm"?


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 6:17:44 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

"Is there any difference between "This is vs it's vs I'm"?"

Not really, it depends on the person and the context.

I usually use "This is.." simply because it's not common to use "Hi" or "Hello" in texts. At least amongst the people that I text with.

Unless they can be in absolutely no doubt about who I am I'll add: "...from ABC." " - we met at the Council meeting.", "the person you just gave your phone number to."

Anything to jog their memory before they delete the text because it's from an unknown number.
British_James
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 5:39:56 PM

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Hi Igor

I would usually use

"Hi/Hello, my name's James/I'm James" in an email or text where the recipient and I don't know each other - it's a first time introduction. I would also use this when introducing myself face-to-face in a meeting.

"Hi/Hello, it's James" when I'm following up on a previous introduction. I'd also use this when leaving a casual voicemail.

"Hi/Hello, this is James" when I'm following up on a previous introduction and want to be slightly more formal or distant. It feels less warm than "it's James"
e.g. "Hi Tim, this is James from ABC Technologies".
I feel I'd also use this when leaving a business voicemail.

Finally, as you may already know, "hi" is less formal than "hello".
Igor_
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 5:55:33 PM
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Joined: 9/18/2018
Posts: 13
Neurons: 83
Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Thank you!!!
Can I ask you what you think about this "document" I found on line?
I'm Joan Smith from XYZ Consultants. Do you have time to discuss the question you asked me on the phone last week?"
"It's Brad Jones from accounting, I have a question about your reimbursement request. Do you have time to answer it now, or should I call you later?"

Here, Why in the first example is used I 'm (I suppose they know eachother)?
Thanks again
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 2:09:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello Igor.

It's a bit 'loose' (not strictly defined), but as FounDit says, "I'm James" sounds like something you would hear at the start of a new conversation with someone who is not a friend (they may be an acquaintance or a stranger).
"Hello, I'm James from ABC company, and I'd like your opinion of cold-salesmen."
"Hello, I'm James from ABC company. We met last week at the conference in Lower Slobovia."

"This is James" or "It's James" would be used to start a conversation with a friend or acquaintance.

If you KNOW that you have had a conversation earlier using the same mobile numbers, you may not even use these phrases - as you know that their phone will link your number to your name and announce you anyway.

My experience, (as you can probably tell from my posts here) is different from Romany's experience. Most people I know would start a text conversation with "Hi" or "Hello". Just the first text in the series, not every one.

Hi James - I stole your example . . . Whistle

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Igor_
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 2:35:44 AM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Ok, thank you.
So, it depends how you "perceive" the other person. If he is a acquaintance (but you want give "distance", I should use "I am"), otherwise "this is or it's". Ok?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 3:42:09 AM

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Yes - how you perceive them - and how you feel they will perceive you.

"I'm James" (and especially "My name is James") assumes that they may not remember who you are.
If you were together in the same room, you would probably have to remind them of who you are - even if they remembered seeing you 'somewhere', they may not remember where.

"This is James" or "It's James" feels more like you're just telling them because they can't see you - if you were together in the same room, you wouldn't mention it; you would KNOW that they knew you.

In your original set of three possibilities,
1. For someone who doesn't know you at all, you'd probably (almost definitely) use "My name is . . ." or "I am . . ." (maybe "I'm . . .). And you would add a description.
"Hello. My name is Igor and I'm calling from ABC company about your life insurance."

2. For someone who knows you, but hasn't got your number, it would almost definitely be "Hello/Hi! It's Igor. . ."

3. For someone you have met during a meeting and then send an sms/email/WhatsApp, I would expect "Hello (slightly more formal than "Hi"), this is Igor. We met at the wind-surfer's convention. . ."
You could use "I'm Igor. . ." to make it a little more distant, or if you feel they may not really remember meeting you.
You could use "It's Igor who spoke with you at the wind-surfer's convention. . ." to assume that they feel you are a friend already.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Igor_
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 4:01:58 PM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
What a fanstastic explenation!!! I have printed all explanations!
Sometimes, it's very hard to get info from books and internet...uff

Richard Adams 1
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 9:27:30 PM

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Location: Falls Church, Virginia, United States
Just figured I'd add my take on this (and registered to do so!), but following along strictly with your OP and those three choices you presented? Well, they do indeed have different uses/contexts, and would fit the bill for three different forms of scenarios across the whole gamut of current personal social familiarity: From someone you know, to those who have no idea you even exist (yet, that is)!

It's SoandSo would be informal, someone you know/who knows you.

This is SoandSo would be more formal for someone you've met/who knows about you, but are not close with.

I'm SoandSo (followed by an explanatory sentence or two, such as "I work for..." or "I was wondering about...", etc.) would be more introductory and very formal. I'd expect to only use this if texting a person that didn't know of me before that. I'd *never* type I'm SoandSo to anyone I knew.

Likewise, all the very same...? These are *very* minor distinctions and things most people wouldn't give a second thought to! You'd expect only native born speakers to merely even be able to pick up on the difference between them. Likewise, that difference does indeed exist - one of the many reasons I love the English language as much as I do; that things which, on the surface, first appear to be utterly identical can transform to mean such a wide array of different things/used only in certain contexts, and how there's a different option for any instance we might encounter or that our minds might dream up!

Whether they were already divergent upon being introduced (meaning they entered English in order to fill an existing gap) or else they evolved over time to fill in various holes in such "usage scenarios", it really is amazing how so many (nearly every!) different word or phrase with the same meaning can actually be quite different from one another and used in certain scenarios where the others might not be as appropriate.

I suppose it's also a reason why only a native user would pick up on/be aware of those contexts - because "officially" (in a dictionary or whatever all have you) their definitions would be absolutely 100% identical! Rather, their difference comes more in a "gut feel" kind of way, alongside a level of formality/closeness.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 21, 2018 2:37:55 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Richard.

Welcome to the forum!

It's good to know that someone from "way over there" gets the same 'feelings' from these three phrases as I do.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Igor_
Posted: Friday, September 21, 2018 4:22:33 AM
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Joined: 9/18/2018
Posts: 13
Neurons: 83
Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Thank you for having answered!
It's fantastic and, at the same time very hard, try to get all nuances of words, expressions that apparently seem to have the same meaning.
Ex, "I am" can be used or when you don't know the other man or when you suppose he/she does not know you (or remember you)... Only a native speaker could give me this explanation...
Or the different "feeling" of "it's" and "this is"!
Fantastic!!!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 21, 2018 6:24:50 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi again.

This is general - not specifically about the "I'm", "This is" phrases.

MOST words in English have synonyms.
This doesn't mean that you can replace one with another.
They are different words because they have different meanings or 'implications'.

I'm sure it's the same in every language, but English is, I think, especially rich in synonyms because of the many languages we have 'borrowed' words from.

Dictionaries (and especially thesauruses) are not really able to differentiate - they are good with similarities but not subtle differences.

So DO ask - you'll always find someone who becomes interested enough to 'write a book' about a pair of words.

You have several "natural speakers" from Britain and Australia, Canada and the USA, India and Pakistan (all speaking slightly different dialects), but also people like thar and IMcRout who grew up with another language but have been speaking English so long that they sound native. They are actually very helpful because they have "had to figure it out themselves" in the past.

As Richard Adams says - it is not a matter of 'definition and meaning' sometimes, but a 'gut feeling' that one word fits but another doesn't.

The more you read and write, the more natural it becomes.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Igor_
Posted: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 4:59:55 PM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Thank you everyone.
Can I ask you if "my name is" is different from "i'm" and if yes, why?
I suppose "my name" can not be used for who I know
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, September 27, 2018 11:57:38 AM

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Igor_ wrote:
Thank you everyone.
Can I ask you if "my name is" is different from "i'm" and if yes, why?
I suppose "my name" can not be used for who I know


There is a slight difference. Using "Hi/Hello, my name is _____" gives the other person time to really start to hear and listen to you, especially on the phone, and is considered to be a bit more polite.

Using, "I'm (name)", is a bit less polite, it's a bit too quick, and may catch the other person off-guard so that they really don't hear, or focus on what was just said. In that case, you may hear, "I'm sorry. Who are you again?"


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Igor_
Posted: Thursday, September 27, 2018 4:51:30 PM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Dancing thank you.
Would you use "my name is" (texting) with somebody you know, but you suppose he doesn't recognize you? I don't think so...
FounDit
Posted: Friday, September 28, 2018 3:08:28 PM

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Igor_ wrote:
Dancing thank you.
Would you use "my name is" (texting) with somebody you know, but you suppose he doesn't recognize you? I don't think so...


In my last post, I was thinking primarily of a phone, but with text, I would repeat what I said earlier, especially 1) and 3):

1) who doesn't know me (Hello/Hi, my name is, or Hi/Hello, I'm (name))
2) who knows me, but he hasn't got my number (Hi/Hello, It's (name)
3) I have met during a meeting and then I send a sms/email/ WhatsApp? (Hi/Hello, This is (name). We met during the meeting...)

If you aren't sure he remembers you, then you should provide some information to help him recall who you are. Perhaps: "Hi/Hello, this is (name). We met (and give some details).


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Igor_
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2018 2:34:00 PM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Dancing
Thanks.
And,if you received something like that "Hi FounDit, my name is Igor. Me met..."
To me, this message would seem very odd. Do you agree with me?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2018 7:40:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It wouldn't be TOO bad (to me) - the 'Hi' is more casual than the 'my name is', but it could work OK.

I just realised that this is one of the annoying things about 'cold callers'. They assume too much familiarity and often say this introductory 'speech' so fast that you can't understand it anyway.

"Hi-it's-Maribella-Anne-from-Sigma-Phi-clones-are-you-happy-with-your-supplier?"
"What? Who?"
"Maribella-Anne-from-Sigma-Phi-clones-are-you-happy-with-your-supplier?"
"Supplier of what?"
(ignoring the fact that I still didn't get the name).
"I'm-from-Sigma-Phi-clones-are-you-happy-with-your-supplier?"
(Hang up at this point.)

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Igor_
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2018 10:15:59 AM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Thanks... I would like to speak English like you. So, using your explanation, could "I use "My name is Igor. . ." to make it a little more distant, or if you feel they may not really remember meeting you"?
Ps in my past message I intended a message by sms etc. Is it the same?
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2018 10:22:41 AM

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Igor_ wrote:
Dancing
Thanks.
And,if you received something like that "Hi FounDit, my name is Igor. Me met..."
To me, this message would seem very odd. Do you agree with me?


It would not sound strange to me if you say we have met already. However, I would appreciate you speaking clearly and slowly and giving me enough time to recall our meeting, perhaps with some details of it.

If I recall it, I would be more inclined to be friendly, but if you speak quickly, and I don't recall meeting you, I'd likely be inclined to be suspicious of the call, and end it quickly.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Igor_
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2018 10:55:33 AM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
FounDit wrote:
Igor_ wrote:
Dancing
Thanks.
And,if you received something like that "Hi FounDit, my name is Igor. Me met..."
To me, this message would seem very odd. Do you agree with me?


It would not sound strange to me if you say we have met already. However, I would appreciate you speaking clearly and slowly and giving me enough time to recall our meeting, perhaps with some details of it.

If I recall it, I would be more inclined to be friendly, but if you speak quickly, and I don't recall meeting you, I'd likely be inclined to be suspicious of the call, and end it quickly.

Ah ok! I intended if you received a message/whatsapp/email... Is it the same?
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2018 11:08:00 AM

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Posts: 9,540
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Igor_ wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Igor_ wrote:
Dancing
Thanks.
And,if you received something like that "Hi FounDit, my name is Igor. Me met..."
To me, this message would seem very odd. Do you agree with me?


It would not sound strange to me if you say we have met already. However, I would appreciate you speaking clearly and slowly and giving me enough time to recall our meeting, perhaps with some details of it.

If I recall it, I would be more inclined to be friendly, but if you speak quickly, and I don't recall meeting you, I'd likely be inclined to be suspicious of the call, and end it quickly.

Ah ok! I intended if you received a message/whatsapp/email... Is it the same?


I apologize. I keep wanting to make this a phone call (laughing).
To answer your question: Yes. If this was a message on an app, I would want some details to remind me who you are, and where we met, in case I don't recognize your name.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Igor_
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2018 12:16:46 PM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Angel No problem.
Thank you.
So I unterstood that "my name" can be used the same way "I am", with the difference the former is slightly more "formal". I can use them to have a little more distance with the other person, or if i feel they may not really remember meeting me (always by sms etx Angel)
Igor_
Posted: Monday, October 1, 2018 5:10:37 PM
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Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
Igor_ wrote:
Angel No problem.
Thank you.
So I unterstood that "my name" can be used the same way "I am", with the difference the former is slightly more "formal". I can use them to have a little more distance with the other person, or if i feel they may not really remember meeting me (always by sms etx Angel)

So, is my name the same of "I am"?
Igor_
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 12:00:31 PM
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Joined: 9/18/2018
Posts: 13
Neurons: 83
Location: Roma, Latium, Italy
So, the only difference between "I am" and "my name" is the level of "formality"?
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